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Canon gives a bump to their most affordable pro cinema camera

When Canon released the 5D Mark II DSLR, a lot of cinema shooters really appreciated its ability to shoot HD video. We've come a long way from those days, though, and now, well, pretty much every camera shoots HD video. Canon, however, has continued to put a fair bit of focus on the motion market, and now they're announcing the EOS C100 Mark II digital video camera.

As the name suggests, it's an update to the original C100, which was meant to be a more affordable option to the C300 and C500. The camera uses the Super 35mm sensor and can now be pushed to 1080p at 60 fps in both AVCHD and MP4 mode. They have also added a tilting screen, something many video shooters like in a camera like this.

One thing that's notably missing is 4K capture, which is starting to become a trend in the industry. However, it's not quite yet a necessity because the amount of people with 4K screens is still incredibly small compared to the number of 1080p sets still sitting in living rooms.

The camera is set to cost $5,500, which means it's still aimed at documentary shooters who will also appreciate its relatively light 2.5-pound weight.

It also has the dual-pixel AF focusing system on-board, which means using it will feel more like an actual camcorder than shooting with a DSLR. The original C100 didn't have the Dual Pixel tech, but they did offer it as an upgrade down the road.

I know this kind of camera isn't typically in our wheelhouse, but this space is becoming more and more interesting to all types of photographers. After all, capturing images is our passion and there are lots of ways to do it.

Canon C100 Mark II Cinema Camera
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Canon C100 Mark II Cinema Camera

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Ditch your lens to get a different look

A pinhole camera is as minimalist as photography gets: All you need 
is a light-tight box with a tiny hole on the front, and something 
light-sensitive fastened onto the inside rear of the box, and you can 
take a picture. In the process, you will get weirdly beautiful results, including infinite focus from near to far (or, often more accurately, equal slight fuzziness from near to far). “Once you realize that there are no knobs, no flashing lights, no buttons, dials, or digital displays to distract you, making pictures becomes fun again rather than a technical chore,” says Andrew Watson, who made this photo of the beach in Brighton, England on Kodak Ektar 100.
You can make your own pinhole camera (out of practically anything), build a kit camera, buy a ready-made camera, or, simplest of all, use the camera you already have, whether film or digital, SLR or ILC, with a pinhole body cap in place of a lens.
STEP 1: 
Learn the basics
The focal length of a pinhole camera is determined by the distance of the pinhole to the film or sensor, and there are optimal pinhole sizes for adequate sharpness. Optimum pinhole size for 50mm would be no bigger than 0.3mm, for example; the f-number would be about f/160. So you’ll need a tripod, or at least a solid perch for the camera.
STEP 2: 
Make your pinhole
You can turn a camera’s body cap into a pinhole with a little fuss. Drill a small (1/8-inch) hole in the center of the cap. For the pinhole itself, use soda-can aluminum. Cut an inch-square piece of the can with a snips, and pierce the center using the smallest needle that will go through. Then tape the pinhole over the hole you drilled in the body cap.
STEP 3: Or buy a pinhole
Commercially made pinhole body caps have the advantage of being properly sized and well machined. Companies such as Rising, Holga, Wanderlust, and Lenox Laser make them, available through camera retailers or direct. Most body-cap pinholes give you a focal length of about 45mm on DSLRs.
STEP 4
: Figure exposure
Your DSLR or ILC metering system will go blind at f/160, although you will be able to compose the picture with live view on a digital camera body. Starting exposure in bright sunlight for ISO 100 would be about 1 second, or ¼ sec for ISO 400.
STEP 5: 
Exploit the look
Place objects or subjects very close to the camera to have them loom against the background (wider focal lengths work best for this effect). Photograph bodies of water in lower light to smooth the water out to glass—no neutral-density filters needed.
STEP 6: 
Do it with film
Many like the look of pinhole photography with film, but you won’t be able to review your exposure in the field. A Black Cat Exposure Guide can be very useful here: it has f-stops to f/1024. We’d recommend color-negative film (used by Andrew Watson for this beach scene) as it has great latitude and can tolerate a lot of overexposure.
beachscene
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

beachscene

Once you procure a pinhole camera (whether you buy one, build one, or make an accessory for your DSLR), shooting pinhole is just a matter of finding the right subject and figuring exposure. Photo: Andrew Watson

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What would happen if you printed every Instagram photo for a year?

It would make a tall pile. A really, really tall pile.

Instagram has been a force in the photography world for a while now, and it doesn't really seem to be slowing down. The folks at Photoworld.com put together a clever visualization that triest to put the crazy number of photos being uploaded to Instagram into perspective.

The animation and the visualiziation are actaully great, but unfortunately, it's still a bit hard to grasp just how many photos we're really dealing with. The numbers get out of hand so fast that it's a little staggering.

According to the Instagram press page, they get about 60 million photos every single day. And over the life of the service, they have had more than 20 billion photos shared in total.

I've heard some people use these stats to suggest that photos are becoming less significant--that the sheer volume of photos is dilluting their impact beyond repair. I can see where that argument is coming from, but I still think it's great that people are so interested in sharing photos. And sharing one image that affects a person you care about should be more than enough of a reminder of how much photos really do matter.

What would happen if you printed every Instagram photo for a year?
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

What would happen if you printed every Instagram photo for a year?

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Flickr Park or Bird Site

A tongue-in-cheek microsite actually shows off one of Flickr's interesting projects

Chances are, you clicked on that headline out of pure confusion. Why would a site need to tell you if your photo was taken in a national park or contained a bird? Well, you don't. But, the folks at Flickr created a pretty funny microsite in response to an xkcd comic.



If you're not familiar with xkcd, they put together a great web comic that pokes fun at a variety of things, but concentrates a lot on tech. It's actually very entertaining and worth checking out on a regular basis.

But, the folks at Flickr saw the comic posted above and took it to the next level. Their microsite will tell you (using GPS data) if your photo was taken in a national park and analyze it to see if a bird is present. There's actually a pretty interesting explanation of Flickr's deep network tech buried within this tongue-in-cheek demonstration.

Flickr Park or Bird Site
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Flickr Bird or Park Site

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The Intrepid Camera Co. wants to make a 4x5 that you can easily take on any adventure

"Compact" and "Affordable" are not typiclaly words that are associated with large format photography. A new Kickstarter from the guys at Intrepid Camera Co. wants to change that.

The prototype of the Intrepid Camera is made out of birch ply wood and is designed to be foldable. It works with 75-300mm lenses using Linhof/Technika lens boards and weighs 1.2 kg (approximately 2.6 lbs)—much lighter than a traditional 4x5. The prototype model shoots with standard 4x5 holders as well as instant film versions. If the Kickstarter campaign is a success they plan to make the camera compatible with graflok backs, as well.

There were only 25 £99 ($119 USD, £20 extra for cameras shipped outside of the UK) Interpid Cameras and they sold out fast. But you can still pick up a full production model and a photographers notebook for £129 ($240 USD). For £189 ($336 USD) you can have something engraved on your Intrepid camera.

While the camera itself is relatively cheap, it doesn’t come with a lens and as anyone who has dabbled in 4x5 photography can tell you—it is an expensive hobby. One box of 25 film sheets typically costs $33 and if you’re just learning you will probably destroy more than half of those. Intrepid estimates that if they are successfully funded they will start shipping cameras by February 2015.

The Kickstarter campaign runs until Nov. 19.

intrepid
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

intrepid

The Intrepid Camera is a lightweight, affordable 4x5.

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Coco Rocha Model Study of Pose

A fascinating look at the human form from almost every angle

Almost any portrait photographer will gladly tell you that posing is a very tricky thing. That's why working with an experienced model can be such a wonderful experience. For Study of Pose, model Coco Rocha struck 1000 different positions and they were captured using an interesting 360-degree photography rig. Judging from the video, it looks like something similar to the familiar bullet time effect.



In addition tot he book, there's also an app that lets you look at the pose from 360-degrees around the model. It's interesting as an art piece itself, but it also seems like something that could be very useful to artists and even photographers who are looking to get familiar with the way a human body looks when it's in a variety of positions.

The hard cover version of the book is available now on Amazon.

From: Dexigner

Coco Rocha Model Study of Pose
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Coco Rocha Study of Pose

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Fall Portrait Photography Tips

Nature is offering up some perfect backdrops, here's how to take advantage of them

To me, taking portraits during the fall feels like cheating. If you live in an area where the leaves provide amazing colors, it seems like it's tough to take a bad picture. But, that doesn't mean it's OK to get lazy and complacent. here are a few tips to make sure you're getting the most out of those awesome fall portrait photos.

Scout your location close to shoot day

You can look out your window and see amazing foliage today, but depending on the weather, it could literally almost all be gone by tomorrow. All it takes is one frost or some strong wind and your amazing autumn backdrop becomes a skeletal arrangement of bare branches that looks like something right out of True Detective.

Scouting your spot is basic portrait photography 101, but don't wait a whole week between your scouting trip and the shoot. Colors can change, leaves can fall, some places like parks even close off sections for the winter.

The Weather Channel actually keeps a pretty handy regional guide that lets you know what phase the leaves are in at any given time.

Keep close tabs on the sun

Unlike the transition of the leaves, the sun remains forever predictable. But, if you're not keeping track of it, you could miss out on precious golden hour minutes. As the days get shorter, the sunset moves ever earlier. Simply checking on the web what time the sun will set should give you the information you need to keep darkness from sneaking up on you.

Have Your Subjects Dress Appropriately

It seems like a no-brainer, but you'd be surprised how many clients I've had show up for an outdoor shoot in October wearing a dress that's meant more for mid-July. You may have a tough time convincing your subjects that a sweater is good wardrobe for a shoot, but be sure to explain how important body language is, and how difficult it is to nail it when they're trying not to shiver.

I find the best wardrobe for this kind of shoot is typically something neutral and basic, so it doesn't fight for attention with the awesome backdrop and, more importantly, the expressions of the people in the photos.

Start Simple

The possibilities are endless when it comes to environmental portraits, but sometimes the options can be a bit overwhelming. I like to start my sessions with a straight forward portrait, leveraging the beauty of the foliage in the background.

This serves a few purposes for me. First, it lets me get a solid shot on the card, so if all my other creative ideas don't turn out how I want, at least they still have a nice picture. It also gives me a nice, neutral setting in which I can get a feel for the subjects. Even if you're shooting a close friend, they may be much different in front of the camera than they are at the bar. Lastly, it may just be the shot your subject wants. An epic landscape portrait may be your favorite from the session, but the one they want hanging on their wall may be the most basic of the bunch.

Don't forget the details

I love shots in the fall. I figure, nature is putting on such an amazing show, I want to get as much of it as I can into my photos. Like any other portrait session, though, the details can make all the difference. If you're thinking about your portraits in terms of a cohesive group rather than a single photo, the details bring out things that might not otherwise be obvious. Have your subject pick up some leaves or shoot their shoes as they stand in a pile of leaves. It helps tell a story rather than giving you a random collection of nice, but disjointed portraits.

Avoid the cliches…or embrace them

People have been putting babies in pumpkins for as long as photography has existed. Some people love it, while others loathe it and every other candy-corn-colored cliche you can think of when it comes to fall photography. Ultimately, though, it's a personal decision.

I find that throwing one cliche images in with a set of more artistic images can act as a nice little break and give the subject a laugh when they're going through the photos. Plus, some people just really like them.

So, feel free to avoid the cliche fall photos ("look at us throwing leaves in the air!"), but think of the laugh they might give you when you're flipping through photos 20 years down the road.

Use backlight to your advantage

Backlighting portrait subjects is a very popular technique at the moment, but fall really is the best time to do it. You get the typical, dreamy flare effect that so many shooters (myself included) are fond of, but it also tends to give the leaves an amazing illuminated appearance.

I prefer to keep the sun out of the frame, blocking it with he subjects themselves or keeping it just out of frame, but you can do it either way based on your preference. Practicing with your lenses to find out how they react to backlit subjects is definitely a good idea. Lenses can flare in very different ways, and sometimes a small movement can mean the difference between an image that's dreamy and beautiful and one that's totally washed out.

Don't get stuck shooting wide open all the time

When we think of portraits, we tend to think of fast lenses and blurry backgrounds, but you can approach fall portraits more like a landscape photo. If you're thinking in that mindset, F/1.4 doesn't make much sense anymore.

By stopping down to F/8 or even beyond, you can get sharper backgrounds and leave some of the focus on the leaves, which are what brought you outside in the first place.

Fall Portrait Photography Tips
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Fall Portrait Photography Tips

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Welcome a 14.7-megapixel screen to the mix

We're starting to hear more and more about 4K imaging, especially now that some cameras, like the Panasonic GH4 and the GoPro HD Hero4 can shoot it right to their memory cards. One of the limiting factors, however, is a lack of screens that can actually display 4K footage in all their pixel-heavy glory. In typical Apple fashion, however, they skipped right over 4K and gave their new Retina iMac computer a built-in 5K display, giving it a total resolution of 5120 x 2880. That's 14.7 megapixels.

To put it into perspective, that's about 7-times as many pixels as it takes to make 1080p, which we currently consider to be HD. Also, if you were to take a photo with the new 8-megapixel iPad camera Apple announced yesterday, it wouldn't be close to big enough to make a wall paper.

In fact, David Hobby made a great point on Twitter yesterday, saying that even a 16-megapixel camera doesn't have enough firepower to make a full-sized wallpaper because of the width.

Of course, the new iMac is also a pretty powerful computer. And at $2,500 including that crazy screen, it actually seems like a pretty good deal, at least in terms of Apple products.

Big screens like this are going to become the norm rather quickly, and that's going to be an interesting development for photographers. The "megapixel race" ended quite some time ago, but now that we're all so hooked on "pixel peeping" will these new screens be enough to start it back up again?

New iMac
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

New iMac

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Transferring your photo archive from Aperture just got less cumbersome

Earlier today Adobe announced a new Lightroom plugin that will put Aperture users at ease. Apple first announced they were discontinuing development of Aperture in June, and at the point users best options were to transfer manually or use a beta-tool—but now an official release has arrived.

Aperture Importer for Mac will easily mitigate all Aperture and iPhoto libraries into Lightroom and keep flags, star ratings, key words, GPS data, rejects, hidden files, color labels, stacks and face tags intact, although the last three will be imported into the program as keywords.

The plugin is free and works with Lightroom 5.6 or later. At this time the plugin is only available for Mac users.

Download the update here.

aperture
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

aperture

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A beautiful and interesting short film about photographer Joseph Allen Freeman

Shooting with a large format camera is very different than just about every other type of photography. It's slow, bulky, and doing anything with the photos requires even more of a process than getting out there to shoot them. There are still some shooters, though, that are committed to the big cameras. Joseph Allen Freeman is one of those photographers and this beautiful short film allows him to explain why he still does it.

[NOTE: There is some swearing in the video, so it may not be appropriate for all ages. But, if you've ever shot large format, you probably understand why he's swearing.]

Through the Ground Glass from Taylor Hawkins on Vimeo.

The film itself is very beautifully shot and the narration does a good job explaining the appeal of the slow process. I was lucky enough to learn to shoot large format in college and his love-hate sentiments sum the whole thing up rather perfectly.

Seeing things like this always make me want to go trolling Craigslist for a 4x5 camera that I can throw over my shoulder before heading out into the world. Then, I remember how expensive the film is and the sad state of my darkroom gear and I'm reminded why I do so love my DSLR.

As a final note, if you're not familiar with large format photography, the title of the film may not make sense. But, large format cameras don't have a typical viewfinder, rather they have a large piece of ground glass on the back that's used to compose and focus. The image is upside down and often not terribly bright, which is why you have to throw a dark cloth over your head to compose your shot.

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From LENS and LightBox to Slate and CNN, who pays what and who doesn't pay at all

PDN recently published a fascinating feature on the proliferation of documentary and fine art photography blogs that revealed the rates many big name websites pay their contributors to showcase great work. David Walker writes:

The Wall Street Journal recently announced plans to publish “more and more original content” on its Photo Journal blog. Director of Photography Jack Van Antwerp says the newspaper is “pushing forward digitally...[and] visuals are key to making that successful. Photography generates traffic.” The blog will publish up to several stories per week, and pay around $400 for each one, Van Antwerp says. The New York Times Lens blog, one of the most prestigious photo blogs, was among the first to publish slideshows of projects, and interview and write about photographers. It pays $350 per slideshow. Other sites with cache among photographers include The New Yorker Photo Booth (which pays $250), CNN Photos ($600), and TIME Lightbox ($750).

Many other blogs online with far smaller audiences outside the photography community don't have the budget to pay at all. Read insights from the leading photo editors and photographers Walker interviewed on when it's appropriate to push for a higher rate, why someone would want to contribute for free, and most importantly, how to leverage that unpaid attention to land bigger assignments.

lens blog
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

lens blog

A screenshot of the newly redesigned New York Times LENS blog homepage, leading with Kathy Ryan's "Office Romance," on Oct. 15, 2014.

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The legendary landscape, wildlife, and cultural photographer explains the essence of his work

Earth Is My Witness is a nearly 400-page book with more than 400 photos. It seems a statement of your career. Why this book, and why now?
I met a publisher [Raoul Goff], and he said, “I would like to do your opus,” and I said, “What the hell is an opus?”
I think it was good timing. My career has been noted for variety, and it’s not the most prudent way to market oneself, if you’ve got subjects ranging from nudes to abstracts to culture to birds on a stick. [Goff] suggested a look back over 40 years, and so I started looking though the archives, and when I pulled out some of my historic best photos and compared them to anything I’m shooting today, they fell apart—the best and sharpest images just wouldn’t stand up. So rather than being a retrospective, this is really a look at these three genres [Desert/Savannah, Ocean /Islands, Tropical/Subtropical], many of which have been shot over the last two years.
So I’ve been running around the world upgrading the quality of the images, and in many cases shooting subjects I hadn’t even shot five years ago. I took it on as a brand-new project, not really looking back but looking forward.
In the book’s afterword, you say you’d like to photograph as many places and see as many things as you possibly can before your life ends. But I detected a sense of urgency.
When you’re in your thirties or forties your entire life seems ahead. I’ve never acted my age or felt my age. But yet, it’s inevitable that in your sixties, you realize, even in the best of circumstances, there are probably 20 years of travel left. So there is that sense that there is a limited amount of time to do what you want to do.
But it goes beyond that. In that afterword you also express an obligation to get out there and photograph.
Absolutely. In my seminars I’m as much an evangelist on stage as trying to teach—it’s really teaching life, and living the passion. Then, if you are in fact contributing to the greater society, there is an obligation to highlight stories that need to be told. And to bring insight and inspiration to other people.
Some say that beautiful pictures of landscapes and animals and indigenous cultures are essentially a form of nostalgia—that it’s all going to be over very soon, and that there is fundamentally no point to it, other than making pretty pictures. How would you respond?
I think that those people who say things like that would probably say that not only about photography but also a litany of other subjects. They are the doubters, the downers.
I could respond in many ways. One point is that there are photographers who are journalists, who are documenting the degradation. I also think that you can inspire, and win someone’s interest, through a positive image as well. I happen to shoot both, but inspiring people through a positive story is probably even more effective than showing the destruction.
The other point is that there are so many positive stories out there that we fail to hear about. We tend to hear the sensational headlines—those things command attention. But there are more eagles in Seattle than there ever have been. They are nesting in every city park. There are more mountain lions in America now than there have been probably in the last hundred years.
And there are cultures to this day that have never had Western contact. There is an organization in the Amazon whose job is to protect indigenous cultures. There are shots that I took 25 years ago that I could never replicate today, because maybe that tribe has changed or, more likely, you can’t even get into these tribes today because they are being protected by organizations.
Whether we have the capacity to thwart all the ills that could face human beings, that’s something that you won’t rally support for by saying,“What’s the use?” Let’s roll up our sleeves and see what we can do.
You describe yourself as a cultural photographer, as opposed to a landscape or a wildlife or a nature photographer. What was the a-ha moment for that?
I was on the first Western expedition into Tibet, by invitation of the Chinese government, in 1984. I took the opportunity to go to this forbidden kingdom. While I was there, I put more interest in the people, the tribes, the mountain villagers, than even photographing Mount Everest and the beautiful land. I remember seeing, in a small town called Shegar, people cramming their heads into a tiny building to watch a black-and-white TV, and it was like they were staring into the light of a train coming their way. And I said, “When I come off this mountain, I want to go to places where tradition is still intact.” Shortly thereafter I started work on a book called Endangered People.
At what point did you go digital?
I went digital exactly when my colleagues told me it’s on par with film. I went on a trip to Antarctica, when the first Canon 12-megapixel full-frame camera came out [the EOS-1Ds]. I got one, went with that plus 500 rolls of film with my film camera and a little laptop—I had never used a computer prior to that.
Leaving South America onto the Drake Passage, I went outside on the boat and I took a picture with the digital camera, just to see what the exposure would look like, brought it back and figured out how to download it onto the computer, and up it came. I saw that and realized I had shot it five minutes before. I have never shot a single exposure of film since. It was like a meat cleaver coming down. It was that immediacy that really connected with me. There was no longing or looking back toward film. It was about “How can I take better pictures and be more efficient?” and digital was just that.
Earth Is My Witness, his 17th book, is due from Insight Editions in October with a list price of $95.
It’s astonishing how many older people who fell away from photography have come back because of digital.
My audiences in seminars are generally between 40 and 70, some even older. And I say congratulate yourself: You’ve got an interest in photography; now make that interest a passion—love it, drink it, and you will live a longer life. People who think, who are creating, who are passionate, tend to live longer. I’m like a role model for the retired set.
How do you put up with all the travel and the usual hassles involved—luggage getting lost, cameras getting lost?
Drugs and alcohol [laughter]. All those flights, getting delayed, it’s part of the business. I cannot just put brakes on and decide I want to retire—I can’t afford to do it, nor would I want to—but boy, the psychology of getting through all those lines and all those delays and all the nonsense of world-travel people... If there were an easier way for me, I would do it. But I don’t have that luxury.
That transporter on the Enterprise...
My god, wouldn’t that be sweet!
Art Wolfe is an award-winning 
photographer based in Seattle.
Art Wolfe
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Art Wolfe

This big cat was shot by Wolfe at Bandhavgarh National Park, Madhya Pradesh, India, with a Canon EOS-1Ds Mark II and a 70–200mm f/2.8L IS II Canon EF lens. Exposure was 1/800 sec at f/2.8, ISO 500. Photo: Art Wolfe

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Huli Man
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Huli Man

Photo: Art Wolfe
Camel Trail, Sahara Desert
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Camel Trail, Sahara Desert

Photo: Art Wolfe
Women of Thar Desert
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Women of Thar Desert

Even as they go about their daily work, the women of the Thar Desert wear beautiful tooled jewelry and colorful dress. Occasionally, they'll gather into groups to discuss a range of subjects from how lazy their men are to village politics. During the long dry season, they'll routinely paint beautiful designs upon their adobe walls and courtyard floors adding a bit of beauty to the otherwise monochromatic world. Photo: Art Wolfe
African Elephants, Okavango Delta, Botswana
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

African Elephants, Okavango Delta, Botswana

Photo: Art Wolfe
Thai Tattoo, Bangkok
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Thai Tattoo, Bangkok

Photo: Art Wolfe
Monks in Myanmar
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Monks in Myanmar

Photo: Art Wolfe
Active Volcano
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Active Volcano

The moon rises over an erupting summit vent in Mt. Etna, Sicily, Italy Photo: Art Wolfe
Humpback Whale, Vava'u, Tonga
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Humpback Whale, Vava'u, Tonga

Tonga is one of the very few places you can actually snorkel within close proximity to whales. We had just five days on the water and four of them were just too windy and the whales were very shy. In a more outgoing moment, whale swam by and eyeballed me. It was extraordinary. Photo: Art Wolfe
Halema'uma'u, Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii, USA
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Halema'uma'u, Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii, USA

Photo: Art Wolfe
Chimbu Men
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Chimbu Men

Chimbu men in bamboo, Simbu Province, Papua New Guinea. Photo: Art Wolfe
Cheetahs
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Cheetahs

Cheetahs often rest on termite mounds from which they are able to survey their surroundings, as here in Phinda Reserve, South Africa. This is a necessity for a mother with many cubs to keep out of harm's way. Photo: Art Wolfe

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A unique take on a very popular subject

By now, you've probably seen a whole pile of time-lapse videos on the web. They're extremely popular, so making one stand out is increasingly tricky. Photographer Julian Tryba used creative editing to make what he calls a "layer-lapse," and the results sure are interesting.

Boston Layer-Lapse from Julian Tryba on Vimeo.
Basically, different parts of the image are stitched together to represent different times of day. So, sometimes you'll have a sky from before sunset and buildings with all of their lights on. There are a couple more editing tricks besides the simple layering, but overall, it makes for an interesting presentation.

What do you think of the treatment? Is it a cool effect or overdone?

From: Reddit

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A round up of the best deals you will find on cameras, lenses and accessories

Photo: Brian Klutch

The cost of photo equipment can add up quickly. We scoured through all the gear we saw this year and found the best values, so you can pay attention to your exposures instead of your bank account.

Cameras

Nikon D3300

Nikon has been delivering lots of resolution in its DSLRs over the past couple of years. In the D3300’s case, this resulted in an Excellent image quality rating in our lab tests from ISO 100 through 400. With faithful color reproduction and speedy autofocus, this $547 entry-level could be just the thing for great shots of your active children. Its fast burst rate of 5 frames per second matches our suggested minimum for shooting sports.

Panasonic Lumix GH3

Panasonic hasn’t stopped selling the GH3, despite releasing the GH4 this year. Why? We think it’s because the company knows that some shooters don’t need to step up to the GH4’s 4K video recording, and the GH3 is a very capable still and video camera in its own right. It earned an Excellent image quality rating from ISO 125 through 400, has Excellent color accuracy, and can capture up to 18 RAW images (or fill your SD card up with JPEGs) at 6 frames per second. With a rugged, weather-sealed body, it’s a bargain at $1,098.

Olympus PEN E-PL5

This mid-level ILC boasts a 16MP Four-Thirds-sized sensor and sensitivity up to ISO 25,600; its 3-inch tilting LCD touchscreen lets you tap your subject to snap the picture. There’s no pop-up flash, but the PL5 comes with Olympus’s small FL-LM1 hot-shoe flash. It’ll record video at up to 1920x1080i60 and its sensor-shift image stabilization will work with whatever lens you mount on the camera. You can pick up the PL5 with a 14-42mm f/3.5-5.6 II R lens for $600.

Samsung NX Mini with 9mm lens

Lots of street shooters will go out with just a single prime lens, typically a wide angle between 24 and 35mm. With its 1-inch sensor, the $400 NX Mini’s 9mm lens has a field of view similar to a 24mm lens on a full-frame camera. It scored an Extremely High image quality rating in our test and has built-in Wi-Fi that lets you change camera controls and trigger the shutter remotely; it’s also easy to transfer images to a smartphone for sharing.

Canon EOS Rebel SL1

If you want a small camera, you might consider an ILC, but Canon’s SL1 is nearly as small as some mirrorless cameras. In our lab tests it achieved an Extremely High image quality rating from ISO 100 through 1600, delivering enough resolving power to make large prints and with solid noise control, so you won’t see much grain unless you want to add it in after the fact. It’s missing Wi-Fi, but you can add an Eye-Fi Mobi card to port images to a smartphone. With an 18–55mm f/3.5–5.6 IS STM kit lens, the SL1 streets for $599.

Pentax 645D

When first announced, Pentax’s 645D seemed a bargain in the medium-format digital world. Now that Ricoh has dropped the price to $4,997, it’s as bargain as you can get for a 40MP medium-format SLR body. Its CCD imager can’t offer the massive sensitivity range of the 645Z, but its range of ISO 100–1600 is what one might have expected before CMOS invaded the medium-format world.

Sony a5000

While Sony’s fancy a6000 has been making more headlines this year, its a5000 lets you get into mirrorless for $448 with a 16–50mm f/3.5–5.6 kit lens. Its 20.1MP APS-C-sized sensor is plenty for the average shooter. It sports Wi-Fi for image sharing, 1920x1080p60 video capture, and a 3.0-inch 460,000-dot tilting LCD that flips up for selfies.

Photo: Brian Klutch

Lenses

Rokinon 16mm f/2 ED AS UMC CS

Made for APS-C bodies, this fast, manual-focus, ultrawide is available in 10 different mounts, including the rarely seen (non-Micro) Four Thirds. The well-damped focusing ring turns 170 degrees and the depth-of-field scale covers all whole stops from f/4 through f/22. The lens is bit large and heavy for its class, uses 77mm filters, and showed visible barrel distortion; but, you’d have to spend hundreds more than this optic’s $379 price to find something comparable with minimal distortion.

Nikon 18-140mm f/3.5-5.6G DX ED VR AF-S

Covering an equivalent focal-length range of 27–210mm on Nikon’s APS-C bodies, this utili-zoom can cover most of the casual shooter’s needs. In our tests it showed distortion on par with other lenses in this class, but it got slightly better SQF results than comparable lenses from Canon, Pentax, and Tokina. Nikon’s Vibration Reduction gave our testers 3 stops of hand-holding leeway in lab tests. Since our test in April of this year, the price has dropped by $100, making it a steal at $497.

Sigma 18–200mm f/3.5–6.3 DC Macro OS HSM

This compact, light, big-range zoom had excellent SQF numbers at all tested focal lengths when we reported our lab results in August. Labeled macro, it has a maximum magnification of 1:2.59 and focuses as close as 12.53 inches. Its optical image stabilization gave us an average of 2.66 stops of shutter-speed leeway, which should help when racked out to 200mm. We described its autofocus as “responsive, accurate, quiet, and in every way satisfying.” What else is there to say? It costs just $399.

Tamron 16–300mm f/3.5–6.3 DiII VC PZD Macro

We dubbed this lens the “Zoom King” in our July 2014 test due to its monstrous 18.8X range. Covering an equivalent of 24.8–465mm on the APS-C bodies it was designed for, it showed a very impressive magnification of 1:2.30, and near-lack of distortion in macro range. We saw no vignetting in the macro range, or at 35mm, 100mm, or 300mm. Even at 16mm, light falloff was gone by f/4. If you’re going to buy one lens to keep on your camera at all times, this $629 optic is the one.

Photo: Brian Klutch

Flashes

Cactus RF60 flash and transceiver

Wireless flash control for multiple off-camera flash units can get pricey quickly, since most manufacturer’s systems won’t work together. The $140 Cactus RF60 has a built in 16-channel transceiver with a maximum range of 328 feet, thanks to its 2.4GHz RF transmission, and a guide number of 183 feet at ISO 100 when zoomed to 105mm. Best of all, it can control multiple brands of flash units simultaneously in up to four groups. If you don’t want to use the flash as a controller, you can add the V6 transceiver for $55.

FlashPoint StreakLight 360 Ws Flash

For an event photographer, nothing’s more helpful than a powerful, long-lasting flash unit. If you can’t abide the over-$1,000 price tag of a Quantum Instruments Qflash, Adorama’s $390 FlashPoint StreakLight 360 Ws unleashes photons with faster recycling times than most shoe-mount flashes, and it’s adjustable from full power down to 1/128 power in 1/3-stop increments. It has an AF-assist beam, two sync jacks, an optical slave trigger, and a stroboscopic mode. It also comes with two diffusion discs and accepts Lumedyne and Quantum accessories.

Phottix Mitros+ and Odin Trigger

An off-camera radio frequency (RF) wireless flash with a shoe-mounted controller lets you place your flash anywhere within hundreds of feet and control the unit from your shooting position. Though slightly less powerful than Canon’s Speedlight 600EX-RT, the Mitros+’s 190 guide number at ISO 100 is plenty powerful. Plus, this flash/trigger combo’s $550 price tag is the same as the cost of the Canon flash alone. Adding Canon’s trigger would bring you up over $800.

Accessories

Canon Pixma MG3520

If you’re a photographer who wants an all-in-one printer/scanner at a great price, you should definitely turn your eye toward a unit made by a dedicated imaging brand such as Canon. This model will scan at up to 1200x2400 dpi, and its AirPrint system lets you print directly from an iPhone or iPad, while the built-in Wi-Fi allows printing from anywhere in your home. It’s only a two-cartridge ink system (black and multi-color) and is limited to letter-size paper, but it’s compatible with a large array of paper types and can be had for just $60.

Epson Perfection V550

If you’re only an occasional 35mm film shooter, it might not make sense to get a dedicated film scanner. A flatbed such as this Epson, which can scan both negatives and slides, will likely prove more versatile in the long run, especially if you and your family also have prints that need digitizing. With 48-bit color depth and 6400X 9600-dpi resolution, the V550 will pull all of the detail out of those prints and its Easy Photo Fix and Digital ICE technology can help speed up any retouching needed. It goes for only $170.

Lomography 100 Negative film

We’ve got a positive outlook on this negative film. At $7.90 for a three pack, that’s just over $2.50 per roll. While it costs about the same as drug-store film, this film probably hasn’t been sitting on a store shelf since the Clinton administration. Plus its high contrast gives you that special Lomo aesthetic that compensates well for old fixed-lens cameras or old lenses that often yield low-contrast images.

Monoprice 27-inch IPS WQHD display

LCD monitors that use in-plane switching (IPS) technology can display more consistently accurate colors across wider viewing angles compared with those using twisted nematic (TN) technology. While IPS monitors usually cost extra, this Monoprice will set you back just $460. According to the company, it can recreate 1.07 billion color combinations.

Quantum Turbo 3 Battery

Though it may seem pricey at $624, the Turbo 3 will reduce your shoe-mount flash’s recycle time to around
a second and can make it last for upwards of 1,000 shots. It can charge up to two flashes at once and has a gauge to let you know how much power you have left. You can also use it to power a wide variety of camera bodies, and it can power your camera and a flash at the same time.

Monoprice 41.3-inch 5-in-1 collapsible reflector

The company that made its name by selling well-made audio-video cables has quietly turned its attention to photo accessories. We were floored by this $14 reflector. It can function as a diffuser or you can use the zippered cover to turn it into a silver, gold, white, or black reflector. The steel frame collapses into a 16-inch storage pouch.

Slik Pro 700DX A.M.T Super Titanium Alloy Tripod

Think of it as the Mongoose BMX bike of tripods. Using titanium alloy instead of aluminum, this $100 three-footed camera support is 40 percent lighter than aluminum tripods with the same 15-pound weight capacity, according to Slik. And while its maximum height is 74.8 inches, you can use its three-step leg angle adjustment to get it down as low as 15 inches. Meanwhile, the 700DX weighs in at a meager 7.05 pounds.

LumoPro LP605 Portable Light Stand

When you’re carrying around a lot of gear, every ounce counts. This light stand extends up to 7.5 feet, but weighs an easy-to-tote 2.6 pounds. Three removable, retractable spikes on the legs can be pushed into the ground to help secure the stand when shooting on location. Made of sturdy aluminum and containing five telescoping sections, the $40 LP605 is topped with a standard 5/8-inch stud with both 3/8-inch and 1/4-inch 20 threads.

3Pod V2AH Video Tripod

A tall, sturdy video tripod is not easy to find. With a smooth-turning pan/tilt fluid head, 77.56-inch maximum height, and load capacity of 14 pounds, this support from Adorama seems like it should cost more than $150. The legs and head each have their own spirit level, the quick-release plate has a nifty safety lock, and the panning arm is reversible to accommodate both left- and right-handed shooters. The ’pod weighs 13.5 pounds and comes with a padded carrying case.

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Lomography's converted cinema filmstock now available in faster speeds

A few months ago Lomography released Cine200, a new tungsten film balance for indoor shooting that offered the visual benefits of cinema film and the rolls sold out super fast. If you missed out on the first batch of Lomography's Cine film, here is your chance to snag some more. Today Lomography announced the arrival of Cine400 Tungsten Balanced Film which has all the benefits of Cine200, but with its slighly faster speed it makes shooting indoors more feasible—the 400 speed makes it twice as sensative to light as Cine200.

Like Cine200, Cine400 is formulated to work with tungsten lighting, which often reads as a harsh orange when shot with films engineered for daylight shooting, but Cine400 also looks great when shot outdoors, although your images will seem a bit more blue. Cine400 is developed using the C-41 process, which any photolab can process, but be warned Lomography is also only prodcuing 4,000 rolls of this stuff—so if you want some you better order fast!

LomoCine
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

LomoCine

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Gail Albert Halaban on her admittedly voyeuristic work

“At first I know it sounds kind of creepy,” says photographer Gail Albert Halaban. “I like to look into people’s windows.”

Following a 2009 series of photographs peering into the apartments of her neighbors in New York, Out My Window, Halaban landed an invitation from M, the magazine section of Le Monde, to come to Paris to continue the work.

The American photographer shoots from one residence into another capturing candid, painterly, Edward Hopper-like scenes of domestic life. Since the subjects seem unaware of the camera as they go about their daily lives, many viewers’ gut reaction is not only to question the work’s voyeristic intentions and value as art, but its legality. Paris is known to have far more privacy restrictions on photographers than anywhere in the U.S.

Halaban admits she always gets prior consent from the people she plans to photograph and the hosts for her vantage point. She avoids telephoto lenses and uses a focal length that approximates the normal window watcher’s view.

“The process of making the photographs connects neighbor to neighbor creating community against the loneliness and overpowering scale of the city,” she says, hoping her new book Paris Views, which comes out this month, inspires others to follow suit.

Halaban Paris
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Halaban Paris

The cover image of "Paris Views," by Gail Albert Halaban, Aperture 2014.

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A rare piece of Nikon glass with a Hollywood history goes on the auction block

There are a lot of old lenses out there that are worth drooling over. The massive Nikon 6mm fisheye, for instance, pops up on eBay from time to time. Right now, you can buy the Nikon 13mm F/5.6 wide-angle lens on ebay for about the price of a family sedan.

The lens isn't as massive as the 6mm, but it's definitely a formidable piece of glass. The images on the auction make it clear just how far the front element sticks out from the barrel of the lens.

According to the auction description, the lens originally belonged to movie special effects wizard, John Dykstra, who is known for working on iconic movies like Star Wars. Because it was meant to be used in cinema applications, the click stops have been removed from the aperture ring, so you'll likely want to reinstall them if you're planning to buy it and use it for photographic purposes.

Right now, the bid is at $16,520 and the reserve has not been met, so we'll be interested to see how high the bidding finally goes. Not only is it a rare Nikon lens, but it also has an interesting Hollywood history to go with it, and that's always good for value.

Do you have a "Holy Grail" lens?

From: Nikon Rumors

Nikon 13mm F/5.6 Lens Ebay
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Nikon 13mm F/5.6 Lens Ebay

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Adobe Max Defog Demo

Adobe's latest software concepts look very cool

Every year, the folks from Adobe show off some new concepts at their MAX conference. This year, there are two main focuses in terms of image editing.

The first tech lets you change the apparent time of day at which a photo was taken. The idea is that the ideal light only comes at a very specific time of day, and using this new technology, you can go back and catch it in post. It's a lofty promise, but the video demo is actually pretty impressive. It reminds me a bit of the software we saw a while back that promises to change the apparent season in which a photo was taken.

The second demo, Defog, shows a software that automatically cuts down on environmental haze that sucks out contrast and saturation in objects that are far away from your camera. It's not something we think about that often, but seeing the before and after images shows that it does clearly make a difference.

Many of the features previewed in the Adobe MAX setting are often later added to official software releases, so we wouldn't be surprised to see these roll out as part of an edition of Photoshop CC down the road.

Adobe Max Defog Demo
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Adobe Max Defog Demo

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2014 Fall Gear Preview Cameras

Check out all the new tools you can add to your arsenal this fall

Photokina years are always fun when it comes to new camera gear. This year was no exception. Almost all of the big players brought something new to the table this year, which means the camera landscape going into 2015 is as exciting as ever.

You'll notice that there aren't a lot of compact cameras on this list, and the ones that are there, are aimed at higher-end users. That's a trend well fully-expect to continue going forward as companies try to give users an experience that their smartphone camera can't.

There are also a few long-rumored cameras on the list, including Canon's 7D Mark II and the full-frame Nikon D750.

As more new cameras are announced, we'll add them to this list so you can keep track of all the newest cameras and keep that list for Santa as current as possible.

Also be sure to check out our Fall Gear Preview for camera bags.

2014 Fall Gear Preview Cameras
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

2014 Fall Gear Preview: Cameras

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Nikon D750 DSLR
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Nikon D750 DSLR

The latest full-frame body from Nikon, the D750, occupies the space between the D610 and the massive megapixels of the D810. It has a substantial, but still manageable 24.3-megapixel sensor and a new 3.2-inch 1,229k dot LCD screen that rotates, a first for a full-frame camera.

GoPro Hero
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

GoPro Hero

The HD Hero4 is obviously the big kahuna in the GoPro family, but their new entry-level camera, the Hero, is pretty significant in its own right. It basically has the specs you'd find in a GoPro 2, giving you full 1080p video at 30 fps and the standard still and time lapse modes.

Canon 7D Mark II
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Canon 7D Mark II

Rumors about Canon's 7D follow-up circulated online for almost two full years before it was actually announced, but it finally appeared for real at Photokina 2014. Their new flagship APS-C camera has an upgraded sensor and an AF system inspired by the one found in the more advanced 1D X and 5D Mark III cameras.

Leica M Edition 60
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Leica M Edition 60

As a German company, Leica likes to make a splash at Photokina, and they sure achieved that goal this year, with the M Edition 60. For almost all intents and purposes, the Edition 60 is basally a standard M, only there's no screen on the back. Yes, it's a digital camera, and no, you can't use the screen to change your settings or look at your photos.

Samsung NX1
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Samsung NX1

With an extremely solid, weatherproof body, an insane amount of AF points (more than 400 between contrast and phase detection), and tons of processing power, the NX1 is Samsung making a statement that they're extremely serious about making cameras.

GoPro HD Hero4 Black and Silver Editions
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

GoPro HD Hero4 Black and Silver Editions

There have been a lot of articles lately talking about how GoPro is more of a lifestyle company than a camera maker, so it can be easy to forget just how powerful their boxy little cameras are. The new HD Hero4 Black edition can capture full 4K video at 30 fps. A lot of bigger cameras haven't even made it to the 4K threshold quite yet. It can also do 120 fps at 1080p, which makes slow-motion all that much sweet.

Canon PowerShot G7 X
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Canon PowerShot G7 X

A few years ago, a fall buying guide would have been packed with compact cameras. This year, however, the impact of smartphone cameras has been substantial. Advanced compacts like Canon's new G7 X, however, still seem to be going strong.

Panasonic LX100
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Panasonic LX100

The other large-sensor compact on our list comes from Panaxonic. The LX100 actually has a Micro Four Thirds sensor inside of it. That's not to say, however, that it's a true M43 camera because it never really uses the whole chip at once. In practical terms, you get about 1.5x the amount of sensor space you'd get from a one-inch sensor, which is still a significant upgrade.

Sony Action Cam Mini
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Sony Action Cam Mini

While GoPro may be the powerhouse when it comes to action cameras, Sony's newest model has a lot going for it. The 170-degree lens is made by Zeiss and it can do 1080p capture at 60 fps. The whole camera is extremely small and durable, and has built-in Wifi for setting up and sharing shots.
Sony QX1 Smartphone Camera
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Sony QX1 Smartphone Camera

For those of you who are unfamiliar, the Sony QX series cameras are an interesting bunch. They don't have a screen, rather they rely on a wireless connection to a smartphone to handle controls and composition of shots. The newest model actually has a full-sized APS-C sensor built-in and allows you to change lenses from Sony's higher-end Alpha series cameras.

It's an interesting concept and one Sony seems committed to.

Fujifilm X100T
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Fujifilm X100T

The Fujifilm X100 series has been a fan-favorite ever since it was introduced way back at Photokina 2010. Since then, Fujifilm has been refining it, and their latest edition is chock full of relatively small, but extremely useful updates.

New Gear: K-S1
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

New Gear: K-S1

Most of the announcement news stories focused on the K-S1's interesting design. Pentax tweaked the common DSLR shape and added a row of lights to the grip to make it truly unique-looking. But, Pentax has always made some of the best entry-level DSLRs around. It has a 20.1-megapixel sensor, an optical viewfinder with 100% coverage, and 1/6000th sec. maximum shutter speed. That's certainly not bad for a camera that comes in at $749 for the body-only.

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Video Shows What Happens Inside Nikon Lenses

Take a look inside of Nikon Lenses

We can sometimes take our lenses for granted. But, the fact of the matter is, they're filled with amazing feats of engineering that make our favorite activity possible. A video from Nikon Asia gives an inside look into the workings of their lenses, including a few enlightening demos of things like image stabilization.

The video removes the shell of the lenses and shows the moving bits and pieces in all of their shiny, machined glory. And it's all set to an extremely peppy electronic soundtrack.

Some of the demos are downright mesmerizing. I particularly like the way the Vibration Reduction demo seems to fit the music.

So, give it a watch, and next time your lens is acting up a little, remember just how complicated things can get inside that little metal and glass tube.

Craving more hypnotic lens demos? Check out these Canon demos showing what goes on inside their lenses.

From: ISO 1200

Video Shows What Happens Inside Nikon Lenses
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Video Shows What Happens Inside Nikon Lenses

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New book celebrating the history of these brightly colored boxes and their unpredictable results

At New York’s West Village Lomography store lo-fi enthusiasts can pick up a Diana Deluxe Kit for $248. The Kit comes with a flash, five different lenses and a variety of other Diana accessories. If that much gear for a toy seems excessive, there is the tiny 35mm Diana Mini for $59, unless you want to gold plated edition with a flash—which you probably do—that plastic camera will run you $139.

The cult of the toy camera is obviously alive and well, but Lomography’s specialty Diana cams are just the tip of the iceberg. The world of toy cameras is vast and filled with strange novelties shaped like Mickey Mouses’ head, fast food items and fruit covered cows.

Camera Crazy, a new book written by Christopher D. Salyers and Buzz Poole, celebrates the legacy of these plastic boxes and their fixed focus lenses, single shutter speeds and unpredictable shooting characteristics.

“Toy cameras are a fascinating subset,” says Salyers, who began collecting Holgas while he was still in high school. “It’s this niche of the photography world that just hasn’t really seen its true popularity yet.”

Camera Crazy is both a chronicle of some of the quirkiest cameras ever made—many of which are part of Salyers’ personal collection—and a history of sorts, focused on how photography transitioned from an expensive professional endeavor to an accessible hobby for the everyman.

“George Eastman releasing the Brownie made [photography] something that was relatively inexpensive, that was fun, that wasn’t about going to a portrait studio and sitting still for three hours,” says Poole. “Right there you have this shift in photography.”

Although the book features a pretty incredible line up of these cameras, both Salyers and Poole stressed that it was important to make Camera Crazy more than that. Pictures taken using the toy cameras, essays and interviews with the founders of Holga, Lomography and Impossible Project round out the photographs of the cameras.

“We have this amazing collection of objects that are noteworthy unto themselves, that in some cases are highly collectable,” says Poole. “But then the subtext of really making photography popular … the marketing of a medium, and there is so much to be said for that.”

Salyers estimates his personal collection of toy cameras is somewhere in the 100s these days, the majority of them tracked down at flea markets, yard sales and eBay. The bulk of his collection is also featured in the book. While cameras like the Mick-a-Matic, The Snoopy-Matic or the Indiana Jones camera from Spain are all quite rare, Salyers says most of the toys aren’t worth more than a few 100 dollars in mint condition. “There just isn’t a huge collector market for them,” he says.

That isn’t to say there aren’t white whales in the toy camera-collecting world. “The cow camera was only released in Italy and in Australia. There were under 5,000,” Salyers says, describing the camera that was the most difficult to find. “It was just a mail in promo thing for yogurt. It’s very cute and it is one of my favorites.”

Camera Crazy will be available on Oct. 25 through Prestel. Pre-order the book here.

voltron cam
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

voltron cam

Voltron Star Shooter Camera, Manufactured in Macau for Impulse Ltd. Year: 1985. Film: 110 Photo: Camera Crazy

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Photos from the first of three spacewalks at the International Space Station

NASA posted some amazing photos to their Flickr stream from Expedition 41 crew’s six hour and 13 minute spacewalk on Tuesday. European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst (pictured above) and NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman were repairing and installing equipment on the International Space Station in the first of three scheduled sessions of “extravehicular activity,” with the next coming up on October 15. The photos were made with a Nikon D2Xs and 10.5mm fisheye lens. See more images and EXIF data here, and visit Alexander Gerst’s Flickr stream for additional outtakes.

NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman, Expedition 41 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

Space selfie 1
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Space selfie 1

European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst, Expedition 41 flight engineer, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

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Think Tanke Drone Camera Bag

This bag is meant for carrying a quadcopter

Drone photography is everywhere at the moment and the DJI Phantom is one of the most common models taking to the skies. In order to make traveling with the quadcopter a little simpler, Think Tank Photo has created an insert for their Airport Accelerator bag, specifically designed to carry the flying photographic tool.

The divider kit costs $35 in addition to the price of the bag and has carefully arranged padding meant to accommodate the odd shape of the DJI Phantom. It gives you spots for the craft itself, as well as the other necessary accessories like the controller, batteries, and any other drone paraphernalia you might need.

The padding is arranged in a rather smart way, too, adding extra protection for sensitive areas like the rotor mount threads, which can't be hurt if you want reliable flight.

It's a clever idea from a company known for their super-tough bags, so it will likely be a very welcome kit addition for many serious drone shooters.

Think Tanke Drone Camera Bag
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Think Tank Drone Camera Bag

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