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Canon Contact Cleaning Body Cap

A simple addition could make body caps more useful

When it comes to fancy body caps, Olympus may be the winner having put an actual lens into a body cap for their micro four thirds cameras. Canon, however, has reportedly filed a patent for a body cap that actually cleans the cameras lens contacts when it's put on.

The original page is in Japanese, but the concept seems pretty simple. A small brush tries to get the gunk off the metal contacts that help your lens talk to your camera body to enable things like autofocus.

It's not exactly earth-shattering, but maybe if body caps also helped clean the camera, I wouldn't lose them all the time.

From: Canon Watch

Canon Contact Cleaning Body Cap
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Canon Contact Cleaning Body Cap

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Sony A7 II Camera

Sony gives their first full-frame ILC some welcome upgrades

UPDATE: The Sony A7 II is coming ot the US in early December 2014 for $1,700 body only. If you want the 28-70mm kit lens, it'll be an even $2,000.

It’s not official in the US at the moment, but starting in January, it looks like Japan will be getting an updated version of the Sony A7 full-frame interchangeable-lens compact camera, and it looks really promising.

The biggest new addition to the camera is the 5-axis image stabilization that’s built-right into the sensor. They promise up to 4.5-stops of stabilization, which is a very significant amount of correction, beyond the 4-stops promised by most optically stabilized lenses right now.

The AF system has also been revamped. It still uses the same number of points, but by refining the system, they claim it will be noticeably faster and better in terms of tracking moving objects.

The body has also changed a little. Now, the grip will actually be a little bigger, which we’re very interested to experience. The compact nature of the A7 in combination with its full-frame sensor is really what makes the camera as excellent as it is. I don’t imagine the change will be that drastic, but if it makes the camera more comfortable to hold, that’s definitely an upgrade.

Sony A7 II Camera
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Sony A7 II Camera

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Hasselblad Stellar II Camera

It'll go great with your top hat and monocle

By now, you probably know about Hasselblad's line of "re-imagined" Sony cameras that they gussy up with luxury materials and sell for a premium. Now, there's a new model in their upscale arsenal in the form of the Stellar II.

As you might expect, the camera is basically a Sony RX100 Mark II (no, not a Mark III) dressed up in some very fancy materials. You can opt for a shiny lacquered wood grip or one made of carbon fiber if that's more your style.



Otherwise, the camera is a lot like the Sony you can still buy at many retailers. The Hasselblad, however, will set you back $2,395. It's a substantial markup and, honestly, it's not really something worth getting mad about. The posts about Hasselblad's Lunar and Stellar cameras are always filled with vitriol, and I get it, but the truth is that these cameras aren't made for pros or enthusiasts, which make up the vast majority of our readership (and staff, for that matter). They're made for collectors and people looking for functional fashion accessories.

Hasselblad Stellar II Camera
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Hasselblad Stellar II Camera

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New book compiles vintage images of small time crooks and criminal masterminds of old-time Chi-town

You’ll find all the evidence you need of Chicago’s crime-ridden past in the belly of the Chicago Tribune.

Five stories below the building in a temperature controlled room there are rows of numbered boxes, stuffed to the gills with decades worth of glass plates and acetate negatives, some of them nearly 100 years old. Two years ago, the Tribune’s photo staff began digging through these archives, unearthing images that in many cases hadn’t been seen since they were first captured. Now, these historic photos of Chicago’s criminal past have been compiled into a new book, Gangsters & Grifters: Classic Crime Photos from the Chicago Tribune.

“I was looking for photos that are so compelling that they would just stop you dead in your tracks,” says Erin Mystkowsk, one of the photo editors who worked on the project. “You know it when you seet it and it just gives you chills.”

Although many of the negatives came with their share of dust, scratches and finger prints, Chicago Tribune photo editors Erin Mystkowski and Marianne Mather Morgan said the bulk of the archive was in solid condition, and those little flaws actually add to the photos.

“We decided early on that we wanted to do as-is. We simply scanned them even if they had cracks and finger prints or dust and scratches,” says Mather Morgan. “We wanted them to be very truthful to their age.”

A willingness to work with those imperfections actually led to a number of surprises during the editing process. Photos of John Dillinger on trial for murder and a young Al Capone (when he was still going by his alias Al Brown) didn’t seem like much on the negatives, but when scanned in produced some incredible results.

“The John Dillinger negative is kind of low light, when we scanned it in and instantly you could see Dillinger in the center in white, handcuffed to the sheriff deputy next to him,” says Mather Morgan. “He looks like he is in control of the room, he almost looks bored.”

The images are often presented alongside their original headlines and subheads, with brief descriptions about the nature of the crimes committed. “It was so interesting to see how the newspaper covered these crimes,” says Mystkowski.

Click through to see pictures from Gangsters & Grifters: Classic Crime Photos from the Chicago Tribune.

Billie
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Billie

Gertrude "Billie" Murphy, 22, is brought in for questioning in the murder case of Michael Stopec, who was shot and killed in an apartment hotel, circa July 1927.

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FAA Drone Photography Regulations

Proposed FAA regulations could make commercial drone flying much tougher

Drone photographers are capable of some truly impressive stuff, but it may soon be getting tougher for commercial drone shooters to get off the ground. According to a report from the Wall Street Journal, the FAA is rolling around the idea of requiring a pilot's license to commercially operate a remote controlled craft.

According to reports, you would need to go through all the training required of a pilot for an actual airplane. Then, you'd still have to follow some stringent rules with the drones themselves. There's a 400-foot altitude cap, they can only be flown during daylight situations, and they have to stay within the pilot's line of site. That's pretty restrictive. And it doesn't just apply to larger commercial crafts, but anything under 55-pounds.

The regulations aren't in place yet, though, and they likely won't even be officially proposed until the end of the year. Then, there will be a period of public comment where people can voice their opinions about the rules. Also, it seems this will only apply to commercial applications, but if you're charging someone money to take pictures with a drone, that will likely fall under the umbrella of the rules.

It will be interesting to see how the whole thing pans out. Places like state parks and cities have been implementing their own drone rules to try and keep people and environments safe in case they decide to crash into the ground.

How do you think the FAA should handle it?

FAA Drone Photography Regulations
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

FAA camera drone regulations

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Tenba DNA 13 camera bag

Tenba focuses the shrink ray on one of the best messenger-style bags around

The original Tenba DNA camera bag was one of the more versatile messenger style bags I've ever tried. Not only was it tough and stylish, but it also had enough room to comfortably carry a 15-inch laptop and tablet at the same time. Now, Tenba has scaled the whole thing down and created the DNA 13 camera bag.



The concept is basically the same. It's a messenger-style bag with a removable padded insert that holds camera gear. While the original DNA 15 was meant to hold a DSLR, the new 13 is geared more toward the interchangeable-lens compact crowd. It also holds a 13-inch laptop and tablet.

So, while it's smaller, it seems to have retained all the things we liked about it. You can order it right now from Tenba for $149.

Tenba DNA 13 camera bag
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Tenba DNA 13 Camera bag

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This DSLR is �operating at its height and takes the trophy �for 2014�s Camera of the Year

Nikon’s D750 is at the head of the pack in all of the most important areas of image capture
Ansel Adams said that “somewhere along the line the manipulative freedom of the photographer must be arrested by the inescapable limitations of the medium.” Among our great joys at Popular Photography is seeing those limitations begin to fall away as new cameras make it easier to capture ever-better images. With this in mind, we name the Nikon D750 2014’s Camera of the Year.
We award Camera of the Year to the image-making machine that most refined or redefined photography in the past 12 months, as determined by our lab and field tests as well as overall performance and technological advancement. This year we mark the further refinement of the mid-level full-frame DSLR. As a body that appeals to both pros (often as a second camera) and serious amateurs (often as the best camera they’ve ever owned), the mightiest of these must be able to handle almost any shooting scenario. It should focus quickly, track your subjects well, employ a fast burst rate with an adequate buffer depth, and deliver high-quality video. The camera’s design must let you change all of the major settings quickly so that you don’t miss a single moment. The Nikon D750 meets all of these qualifications with aplomb.
Two years ago, Canon’s EOS 5D Mark III garnered our Camera of the Year award. At the time, we noted that Nikon’s D810, its direct competitor, captured higher resolution but was, consequently, accompanied by more noise and slower bursts. While many shooters were happy with such extreme resolving power, plenty yearned for the versatility of higher ISOs and speedier bursts.
The D750 gives you all of the above. It out-resolves the 5D Mark III, captures bursts at 6.5 frames per second (compare this to the Canon’s 6 fps), and keeps noise to Acceptable throughout its sensitivity range of ISO 50–51, 200. It maintains top honors in our noise test up to ISO 800. Plus, Nikon’s 3D AF tracking is simply the best focus tracking you can find in a DSLR or ILC.
Nikon has been listening to videographers and has incorporated features such as power aperture, which allows better shooting than when using a traditional DSLR or lens. Other video features include control over mic recording level and frequency response, a wind cut filter, and zebra stripes to warn of overexposure. It records full 1920x1080 HD video at 60 fps to output half-speed footage in your final edit.
Another boon to those making moving pictures is the tilting 3.2-inch 1,129,000-dot LCD. The tilting makes shooting video more comfortable and can allow you to build a modestly priced video-shooting kit without an external monitor. This should prove appealing for filmmakers who prefer to keep costs down. Of course, we also found plenty of opportunities to make use of the tilt during live-view shooting of still images.
In addition to sporting a pop-up flash that can trigger off-camera accessory flashes—something that the 5D Mark III inexplicably doesn’t include—the Nikon D750 has built-in Wi-Fi. In an age when information is expected to flow seamlessly between our devices, it’s mind-boggling that some camera makers still don’t include Wi-Fi in all of their models. Nikon has been guilty of excluding it from many DSLRs in the past, but the D750 has it. In addition to being able to transfer files to your smartphone or tablet, Nikon’s Wireless Mobile Utility app lets you change a number of camera settings and capture images remotely—without touching the camera itself.
Why it Won
•Excellent image quality with well- controlled noise as ISO rises
•Industry-leading 51-point 3D autofocus tracking system
•Burst rate of 6.5 fps for up to 87 JPEG or 15 RAW frames
•Built-in Wi-Fi for image transfer to—and control through—your mobile device
•Tilting 3.2-inch, 1,129,000-dot LCD screen with brightness control
•Well-designed, weather-sealed magnesium-alloy body
•HD video recording at up to 1920x1080p 60 fps with clean HDMI out for external recorders
The Finalists: Runners Up

Panasonic and Fujifilm each brought mirrorless ILCs with ground-breaking features.

Silver Medalist: Panasonic Lumix GH4
Dedicated video enthusiasts might wonder why we didn’t award our trophy to Panasonic’s $1,698 Four Thirds–based 16.05MP Lumix GH4. As the first consumer-grade camera to offer 4K video recording at 30 fps, the GH4 offers something that few cameras in its price range do. Plus, it lets you record 4K to an SD card, while Sony’s A7s, which also records 4K, requires an external recorder for 4K.
At the same time, while the GH4 delivers excellent image quality and does a nice job of controlling noise as sensitivity rises, it can’t quite keep up with the D750’s still-imaging prowess. The Nikon’s ability to keep noise at Acceptable levels throughout its sensitivity range, while the GH4 reaches Unacceptable at ISO 12,800 and above, places the D750 at a distinct advantage.
Plus, the Nikon wins on resolution. The GH4 dips below our 2500 lines per picture height cutoff for an Excellent rating above ISO 400, while the D750 delivers 2850 lines at ISO 800. The Nikon focuses faster in very low light and employs tracking beyond the GH4’s abilities.
To its credit, the GH4 has a great, highly customizable interface that offers just as much to shooters who embrace a touchscreen as it does to those who prefer buttons and dials. It’s smaller and lighter than most DSLRs, though not by too much, and Micro Four Thirds lenses of similar speed and focal lengths are typically smaller and lighter than their APS-C or full-frame DSLR system counterparts. The GH4 also boasts a monitor that flips out to the side and then tilts up and down, giving a wider range of angles than the D750’s.
Silver Medalist: Fujifilm X-T1
Fujifilm’s $1,200 APS-C-size 16.3MP X-T1 also impressed us enough to make its way into the final three. Like the GH4, the X-T1 couldn’t keep up with the D750 in our Resolution test. The X-T1’s best result was 2475 lines at ISO 200—the lowest sensitivity setting at which you can shoot RAW. In our tests, the X-T1 came up short controlling noise compared with the GH4 and the D750. However, with judicious application of noise reduction in a RAW converter such as Adobe Photoshop Lightroom, you can get better results than you would with the version of Silkypix that ships with the camera, which is what we used to convert the RAW images in our test.
The charm of the X-T1, though, is in its overall design. Some shooters don’t understand why a photographer would prefer the X-T1’s whole-stop shutter speed dial over the multi-use command wheel, but those shooters can easily use one of the wheels or dials on the X-T1 to perform that function. Plus, if you’re shooting in aperture-priority mode, then the shutter speed dial and exposure compensation dial work together to provide seamless access to those third-stop shutter speeds.
Perhaps the best thing about the X-T1’s controls is that you don’t need a shooting mode dial. Set the aperture ring to A while the shutter speed dial is not set to A and you’ll be in shutter-priority. Set them both to A and you’re in program mode. This makes for quick switching between manual and other modes, freeing up space on the camera body for dedicated controls. As with the D750, the X-T1 has a tilting LCD and records video up to 1920x1080, 60 fps.
One of the X-T1’s coolest features is its 0.5-inch, 2,360,000-dot OLED viewfinder, one of the largest we’ve seen in any camera with an EVF. It’s so large that Fujifilm includes a mode that shrinks the image preview and places info to the side. The experience in the larger mode is quite immersive, and we spent most of our field-testing time using it. Plus, this OLED finder has a particularly fast refresh rate. The stuttering that used to make it nearly impossible to pan the camera while looking through the EVF without inducing a headache is gone. It was often hard to tell we weren’t looking at an analog image.
As with the other two finalists, the X-T1 has built-in Wi-Fi. Fujifilm’s Camera Remote app provides access to some camera settings while also letting you trigger the shutter and transfer images to your mobile device. The X-T1’s main drawbacks are its lack of a second memory card slot and the absence of a pop-up flash. Sure, it comes with the EF-X8 hot-shoe flash, but it would have been nice not to need it.
All of our finalists are great cameras, but the D750 embodies the do-anything, rugged DSLR that remains the object of desire for most photographers. One Popular Photography staffer went so far as to wonder whether, given the growing prominence of mirrorless cameras, this will be the last DSLR to win the coveted title of Camera of the Year. While that probably won’t be the case, we do expect that ILCs will continue to impress shooters of all kinds with innovative ideas and powerful bodies. Meanwhile, the D750 reminds us that DSLRs remain as relevant as ever.
Honorable Mentions: Two Innovators
Pentax 645Z
While we certainly love our finalists, this year also saw strong cameras from Ricoh and Samsung. In the case of Ricoh we saw its first foray into medium-format CMOS: Its Pentax 51.4MP 645Z delivered a whopping 4425 lines per picture height in our test and will only set you back $8,497 (body only). Sure, that’s a lot of money. But it’s nowhere near the tens of thousands you’d have to spend for other CMOS-based medium-format digitals. Most of those other cameras don’t have the 645Z’s multi-point AF system, tilting LCD screen, high sensitivity settings, or familiar DSLR-style control layout. While the 645Z doesn’t have the wide appeal, well-controlled noise, and overall versatility of the Nikon D750, it certainly deserves credit for helping to move medium-format photography back into the mainstream.
Samsung NX30
Although Samsung is poised to unleash a new flagship camera body to the world with its NX1, it was the NX30 that caught our eye when we tested it. It served up Excellent-level resolution up to ISO 400, kept noise to Low or better up to ISO 3200, showed super-accurate color reproduction, and integrates very smoothly with smartphones thanks to its built-in dual-band Wi-Fi. Its 2,359,000-dot LCD EVF doesn’t quite match the refresh rate of the Fujifilm, but it comes really close. While Samsung cameras haven’t always had the best reputation, the company has been working hard to step up in recent years, and the NX30 showed that it should be taken seriously. The NX30 also has an impressive array of lenses to go with the APS-C-based camera system. We expect Samsung to continue to give its rival camera makers plenty to be afraid of in the coming years.

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Ryan Adams Stops Concert For Flash Photography

The musician's condition causes flashes of light to trigger vertigo-like symptons

Ménière’s disease is an inner-ear condition with which many people aren't familiar. It's a tricky thing because it affects people in a wide variety of ways. UFC president Dana White has it and so does Musician Ryan Adams. At a recent concert, a fan in the front row repeatedly took flash photos of the performer during his set and it caused enough of a problem that he stopped the set and asked them to stop.

Here's the video (language NSFW). The notable message comes after the 2:30 mark.

If a full-on episode is triggered, many people describe vertigo-like symptons including dizziness and nausea. It's actually a serious thing.

While this is obviously an unusual circumstance, it does lend some credibility to the "no flash" rule employed by many music venues. Not only can it hurt the experience of the audience, but the performers as well.

Ryan Adams Stops Concert For Flash Photography
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Ryan Adams Stops Concert For Flash Photography

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The Nikon D750 has got just what you�ve been waiting for

A lot has happened in the camera world during the six years since Nikon released the D700. Megapixel counts now top 36MP, Wi-Fi is a fixture in many cameras (though too few DSLRs), and HD video capture is now a basic feature in any camera. Nikon ticked the video and resolution boxes with the D810 and D800 before it. Until now, though, Nikon hasn’t had a DSLR that can compete with the general versatility of Canon’s EOS 5D Mark III ($3,399 street, body only). Enter the D750.
With a 24.3MP sensor, video up to 1920x1080p 60 fps, built-in Wi-Fi, sensitivity up to ISO 51,200, and a well-built, rugged, weather-resistant body, the D750 seems to be the DSLR many Nikon shooters have been waiting for. Given the camera’s performance in the Popular Photography Test Lab and in our field tests, we think they will be quite pleased.
In the Test Lab
Balancing ample resolving power and well-controlled noise, the D750 earned an Excellent overall Image Quality rating from its lowest sensitivity of ISO 50 through ISO 3200. While Canon’s 5D Mark III managed to keep its Excellent rating up to ISO 12,800, it did so with less resolution than the D750. A tad more noise reduction could make the D750 match the Canon’s result. But our tests always use the default noise reduction settings in the RAW conversion software that ships with the camera.
With about 3MP more than the Canon, it’s no surprise that this Nikon won in our Resolution test. The D750 captured 2875 lines per picture height at ISO 50. The 5D Mark III turned in 2750 lines at the same setting. As sensitivity increased, the D750 held a lot of its resolving power. At ISO 800 it maintained 2850 lines. ISO 1600 saw that drop to 2725 lines. Three more stops up the sensitivity ladder, at ISO 12,800, the D750 yielded 2610 lines. After that point, resolution dropped more sharply but remained impressive, serving up 2100 lines at the camera’s top sensitivity of ISO 51,200. By comparison, the 5D Mark III showed 2520 lines at ISO 12,800 and 1910 lines at ISO 51,200.
In our Noise test the D750 fared well, though it couldn’t match the Canon’s stellar result. The D750 kept noise to a Low or better rating from ISO 50 through ISO 3200, while the 5D Mark III maintained a Low or better rating up to ISO 12,800. Worth noting, though, is that the D750 never ventured into Unacceptable territory in our ratings. Even at ISO 51,200 the D750 scored a Moderate rating. The 5D Mark III got Unacceptable ratings at both ISO 51,200 and its top setting of ISO 102,400. Furthermore, the Nikon proved cleaner at its lowest ISOs when compared to the Canon. From ISO 1600 through ISO 12,800, however, the Canon beats the Nikon on noise. At all other sensitivity settings the Nikon edges it out.
Both of these cameras easily earned Excellent ratings in our Color Accuracy test. The Nikon D750 scored an average Delta E of 6.7 in this test, while the 5D Mark III got a 6.9.
The D750 performed well in our autofocus test too, though it lagged slightly behind the 5D Mark III by about a tenth of a second in the brightest portions of the test and by about two tenths in the dimmest portions. Our test measures how fast the camera is able to lock focus and capture an image. It doesn’t measure the tracking capabilities.
In the Field
The D750 boasts a solid-feeling magnesium-alloy body with a nice, deep grip. A pair of programmable function buttons on the front of the body are easy to reach and can come in handy if you like to customize your DSLR’s controls.
The D750 is designed for two-handed shooting with three buttons on the front left of the body, as well as the usual Nikon AF/M switch. The locking mode dial finds its home on the left side of the camera top, with the drive mode selector underneath it. There’s a pair of SD card slots to record your images. Changing between the optical finder and live view/video is very simple and fast thanks to the dedicated LV button that’s mounted within a switch to select between still and video.
The biggest difference between the D750’s body and the D810’s—especially significant for video shooters—is the tilting LCD screen. Given that the D750 has most of the same video features as the D810, some videographers might choose the D750 for the screen alone. Plus, the video footage we shot looked excellent. There were very few artifacts and minimal Jello effect. Fast-moving subjects were rendered well. Footage of a trio of flags in high winds showed their vigorous flapping with aplomb. With lesser cameras they’d likely devolve into a mess of artifacts.
Still shooters should appreciate the tilting LCD, too. We found it helpful when shooting still images of graffiti painted high up on a wall. To combat the distortion that comes with shooting upward at a subject like that, we were able to hold the camera high and frame a better shot in less time than would be possible shooting blind.
While photographing some dancers, we were able to give the D750’s 3D tracking AF a nice workout. It did a fantastic job of keeping up with the their frantic motion. Plus, as is always the case with Nikon’s tracking, the camera shows you the AF points it moves to as it does so, which we found really helpful and reassuring.
Burst shooters will appreciate the D750’s 6.5 fps burst rate. Plus, you can shoot up to 87 large, fine JPEGs, 15 losslessly compressed 14-bit RAW files, or 10 RAW+JPEG frames before the buffer fills.
Since few of Nikon’s cameras have it, we were very pleased to see that the D750 has built-in Wi-Fi. You can transfer images from the camera to your smartphone and control many of the camera’s functions as well. We had no trouble using the Nikon app with a Samsung Galaxy S3 smartphone. It was particularly helpful to have on hand when shooting long exposures on a tripod without a wired remote trigger on hand.
The Bottom Line
In our lab tests, it’s hard to say whether the D750 or the 5D Mark III really wins. We’re inclined to give the D750 a slight edge over the Canon only because the Canon’s advantage in noise control can easily go away if you apply a tad more noise reduction to the Nikon’s files. The Nikon’s extra resolving power coupled with lower noise at lower ISOs can’t be matched by the Canon. Still, that distinction is modest. For most shooters, it won’t make much difference. Similarly, Nikon’s 3D AF tracking edges out Canon’s tracking a bit, especially in that it provides feedback about active AF points as you shoot. Both systems have plenty of excellent lenses and accessories and are supported widely by third-party lens makers and accessory manufacturers. In the end, the D750 versus 5D Mark III matchup is about as close a contest as you’ll see in the camera world. Any photographer would be well served by either body, though this Nikon would save you more than $1,000.
Nikon shooters trying to choose between the D750 and D610 ($1,797 street, body only) should consider whether the D750’s built-in Wi-Fi, lower noise, faster bursts, deeper buffer, more extensive weather sealing, and more robust AF system are worth the extra $500. We tend to think that it is.
Specifications
IMAGING: 24.3MP effective, FX format (full-frame) CMOS sensor captures images at 6016x4016 pixels with 14 bits/color in RAW mode
STORAGE: Dual SD slots store JPEG, NEF RAW, and RAW + JPEG files
BURST RATE: Full-sized JPEGs (Fine mode), up to 87 shots at 6.5 fps; RAW (14-bit losslessly compressed), up to 15 shots at 6.5 fps; RAW+JPEG, up to 10 shots at 6.5 fps
AF SYSTEM: TTL phase detection with 51 illuminated focus points (15 cross-type); single-shot and continuous AF with 3D focus tracking. AF points can be grouped and selected by area. Tested sensitivity down to EV –2 (at ISO 100, f/1.4).
LIVE VIEW: TTL contrast-detection autofocus
SHUTTER SPEEDS: 1/4000 to 30 sec, plus B (1/3-, 1/2-, or 1-EV increments); 150,000-cycle rating
METERING: TTL metering with 91,000-pixel RGB sensor; 3D Matrix (evaluative), centerweighted, and spot (approx. 1.5% of viewfinder). EV 0–20 (ISO 100).
ISO RANGE: Normal, ISO 100–12,800 (in 1/3-EV increments); expanded, ISO 50–51,200
VIDEO: Records at up to 1920x1080 at 60 fps; 1280x720 at 60 fps; in H.264 MPEG-4 MOV format; built-in stereo microphone; stereo minijack input; uncompressed output via HDMI
FLASH: Built-in pop-up with iTTL autoflash and wireless control of optional flash units, GN 39 (ISO 100; feet); flash sync to 1/200 sec
VIEWFINDER: Fixed eye-level pentaprism
LCD: 3.2-in. TFT with 1,129,000-dot resolution; 5-step brightness adjustment
OUTPUT: USB 2.0, HDMI video, composite video stereo minijack audio
BATTERY: Rechargeable EN-EL15 Li-ion, CIPA rating 1230 shots (with optical viewfinder)
SIZE/WEIGHT: 5.6x4.5x3.1 in., 1.9 lb with a card and battery.
STREET PRICE: $2,297, body only

VIEWFINDER TEST: 
Accuracy, 100% (Excellent); Magnification, 0.7X (Very Good)

Nikon D750
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Nikon D750

Nikon D750 has a 24.3MP full-frame CMOS sensor, 1920x1080p60 video capture, 6.5 fps bursts, 3.2-inch, 1.23-million-dot LCD screen for $2,297 street, (body only). Photo: Brian Klutch

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Photoshop Streaming Brings Full Photoshop to a Web Browser

Could the days of installing Photoshop be coming to an end?

It has become very clear in the past couple years that Adobe would like to have Photoshop and their other editing tools on every possible screen. Now, they’re working on an interesting project that would allow users to use a full version of the Photoshop software right through Google’s Chrome web browser without the need for downloading or installing any programs.

It’s called the Project Photoshop Streaming program and Adobe has already apparently made quite a bit of progress on it. The idea is to give people access to literally all of the Photoshop tools from any computer and use Google Drive as a file system to backup and save files.

Of course, this whole thing is a rather major undertaking so there are some pretty big hurdles at the moment. For instance, there’s no GPU integration, which means some key features like overlays and the awesome color sampler ring are out of the question at the moment. You also can’t interface with other devices like cameras and scanners. Even printing is out of the question at the moment.

Right now, Adobe is just giving the program a shot, but it does feel like something worth pursuing for them. It also seems in line with their Creative Cloud subscription model. After all, it would be giving subscribers something truly new and useful in exchange for subscribing. The Beta is currently only available to some Educational users, but may roll out wider in the futre.

What do you think? Would running Photoshop in a browser be something you would find useful?

http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2014/11/eyes-on-with-streaming-photoshop-adobes-plan-to-bring-ps-to-the-cloud/From: Ars Technica

Photoshop Streaming Brings Full Photoshop to a Web Browser
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Photoshop Chrome

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Panlight Rotating Flash Mount

It's like a tiny, robotic lighting assistant

There are all kinds of ways to remotely trigger a flash, inclusing radio frequency, optical sensors, and even a plain old long cord. You can even control flash power remotely with things like the Pocket Wizard Flex system. Changing the direction of your flash from afar, however, is trickier and often requires walking over to your flash (or making your assistant do it). The Panlight, however, makes it a lot simpler.

The flash sits on a rotating base that's controlled remotely with a radio remote. It has a range of up to 100 feet and can swivel the flash left and right or tilt it up and down. It moves at a nice consistent pace, so it's not crazy conspicuous if you happen to be using it at a wedding or in some other quiet situation.

You can also add an adapter to the Panlight and attach a camera to it. It's likely too loud to shoot with video if you're using audio from the camera, but if you're going to be cutting the audio track anyway, it seems like it could be a great way to pan and tilt.

It's currently in Kickstarter mode and if you pledge roughly $163, you can get one of your own.

It seems like a pretty nifty invention, but it has some real funding momentum to build if it wants to meet its goal.

Panlight Rotating Flash Mount
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Panlight Rotating Flash Mount

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First look at Leica's LCD-free camera system

At the Photokina trade show this year Leica announced that they would be making a special 60th anniversary version of the M (typ 240) to mark this milestone for the company’s iconic camera system. In conjunction with Audi’s industrial designers, Leica created a camera that they say is dedicated to, “reductionism as a celebration of photographic art.” What this means is a digital rangefinder body that has no LCD screen and only gives you control over shutter speed, aperture, focusing, and ISO.

Given a few moments with the camera, we didn’t even notice a way to format an SD card. Add to that the fact that it has no lugs with which to attach a camera strap and you have to wonder if Leica expects these collectible cameras to ever be used to make photos at all. They’re lovely to look at though.

CLICK HERE TO SEE THE CAMERA

M60-leica
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

M60-leica

Leica's 60th anniversary version of the M (typ 240) is a digital rangefinder body that has no LCD screen.

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Leica M Edition 60
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Leica M Edition 60

Audi’s design team probably felt that strap lugs would ruin the sleek curve of the Leica 60’s rounded sides.
Leica M Edition 60
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Leica M Edition 60

The Leica 60 is shown here with its kit lens, the 35mm f/1.4 Summilux-M. A special version of the 50mm f/0.95 Noctilux-M, with matching silver paint, is available for $11,350.
Leica M Edition 60
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Leica M Edition 60

The ISO wheel on the back seems a natural replacement for the LCD screen, especially given the way that this location was sometimes used as a reminder of the currently loaded film speed before the digital age.
Leica M Edition 60
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Leica M Edition 60

There’s no red Leica dot on the Leica 60, just as the original M body had no such circular badge.
Leica M Edition 60
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Leica M Edition 60

You may already be out of luck if you want to buy one of the 600 limited edition Leica 60 kits. We’ve been told that all of them have been preordered, despite the $18,500 price tag.

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New app allows you to print your photos on your kicks for $110

Adidas' MiZX Flux app, which allows uses to design custom Adidas shoes using photos from their phones, has finally opened up ordering for customers in the United States. The app was first announced last spring, and has been available for download for the last few months, but until recently the awsome custom kicks you created with MiZX could only live in the digital space.

MiZX is available for iOS and Android and is easy to use. You select your size, country and gender, take a photo or select one from your phone's storage and then scale and place the image on the shoe. MiZX then gives you a 360° preview of what the sneakers will look like and an order option for $110. If you are indecisive (like I am) you can save your designs in the apps "Shoebox" until you decide on the perfect picture. Images need to be shot with a camera with over 5 megapixels in order to print on the shoes—probably Adidas' way of making sure people aren't trying to print things they've screengrabbed from the web.

A pair of shoes designed from an old Instagram photo.

To safeguard against stolen designs Adidas also runs everything through a legal moderation team before they print. According to the FAQ of the app, designs submitted that are text heavy, branded with a company name, use images of celebrities or are considered indecent will be rejected--so downloading a bunch of hacked celerbity nudes and trying to print them on your shoes won't fly.

I've had a lot of fun messing with app using the photos stored in my camera roll and, with a little creativity, I think the MiZX Flux app could create some pretty incredible looking shoes.

Interested in other objects that can be custom printed with your photos? Check out our list here.

burger shoes
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

burger shoes

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Where's our 12-300 F/1.4 lens?

Fast lenses have always been desirable, but here in the internet age, we're a bit spoiled. In fact, I saw a comment on another site calling the new Canon 100-400mm F/4.5-5.6 II zoom lens a "door stop" because it wasn't fast enough. Comments like that suggest that there are people out there who don't actually know what F number actually represents. This handy video from Matt Granger does a good job exploring the topic.

To get the F number of a lens, you divide the focal length by the diameter of the aperture. This is easily done because they're both measured in millimeters, but it's not a calculation we're really ever required to do as modern photographers.

So, can you make lenses with absurdly low F numbers? Sure, but the results aren't always great. The video makes mention of a Zeiss lens with an F/0.33 f number, but it looks ridiculous and doesn't actually work.

If you're in the mood for more insane lenses, check out our list of crazy lenses that actually exist. A few of them are actually mentioned in the video.

From: PetaPixel

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An American photojournalist gets in on the fun at Nigerian weddings

Even with endless guest lists, Nigerian weddings still draw plenty of uninvited guests. Everyone in the community attends these brightly decorated multiday events, where food is plentiful and gifts pile up for both the newlyweds and invitees. At larger weddings, dozens of photographers mob the bride and groom like paparazzi.

American photographer Glenna Gordon often appears among the wedding crashers. (Whether invited or not, she always introduces herself to the families of the bride and groom and asks permission to photograph the event.) The 33-year-old freelancer attended her first Nigerian wedding in 2012 with one of the official photographers. She had been living in Uganda for five years, working as a writer and photographer for international media outlets, but had started focusing solely on her photographic work, including assignments throughout West Africa and personal in-depth documentary projects.

Glenna Gordon
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Glenna Gordon

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Key tips for adjusting your approach to make the most of natural light

It is often said that light is the lifeblood of photography. What exactly does that mean? Aside from the obvious fact that without illumination there would be no image, the quality and characteristics of light greatly determine the visual impact that a photograph will have with a viewer. Light, for better or worse, can turn an expertly composed scene into something bland and boring—or transform the ordinary into the extraordinary and magical.

For the novice, determining the difference between good and bad light can be confusing. There really is no objective scale for “good” and “bad,” only various degrees of accommodating light for different photographic situations. The key to mastering light is knowing how to match the available natural light to the appropriate scene, subject, or situation.

To help illuminate this process, let’s focus on three basic attributes of light: intensity, color, and direction.

The Brightness Factor

Intensity refers to the volume or amount of light the scene or subject receives from the sun, the primary light source for outdoor photography. Light of high intensity is most closely associated with the bright sun at midday, when many photographers put their cameras away and take their naps.

Pejoratively referred to as harsh or even idle light, the bright midday sun is usable as long as the entire subject or scene is evenly illuminated, avoiding distracting shadows and bright highlights (as seen in my photo of a charging bear). Working with natural reflectors—such as the surface of a lake—can fill in the darker shadows and make for a more balanced exposure.

Reflected Glow: Sandhill cranes fly over the Magdalena Mountains at sunrise in Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, NM. Bernabe captured them with a Canon EOS 5D Mark III and 200–400mm f/4L Canon EF IS lens, with an exposure of 1/640 sec at f/7.1, ISO 2000. Photo: Richard Bernabe

Light of low intensity is soft and diffused, ideal for revealing important details in intimate landscapes and macro photos. Cloudy and overcast skies create these conditions, and a bright, overcast, midday sky is the best scenario. Soft light evenly illuminates the scene, and its tonal range is compressed. Waterfalls and stream scenes are ideal in cloudy, low-intensity light, as long as the featureless white skies are omitted from the composition.

Bounced light and glow are forms of soft light reflected from either clouds or some other surface, such as buildings or canyon walls. Glow occurs when the sole source of light reflects from the sky, usually during the twilight hours immediately before sunrise and after sunset (as in the picture of cranes in flight). Depending on whether there are clouds, the light can turn colorful shades of pink, red, or gold. Glow and bounced light are similar to overcast light in that it is soft and creates muted shadows and highlights.

Chiaroscuro (an Italian term meaning “light-dark”) describes the interplay of both direct light and shadows across the landscape—essentially variations in light intensity within a given scene. This type of lighting has often been employed by master artists to help create a sense of depth in their paintings. Partly cloudy days, with mottled sunlight cast across the landscape, create this condition, which can be utilized for a distinctive textured effect.

Powerful Hues

The light’s color can have strong implications for the impact of an image. The color temperature—its coolness or warmth—can be “corrected” by the white balance setting either in the digital camera (if shooting JPEGs) or on your computer during the processing and conversion of RAW files. But don’t be too hasty in removing these useful color shifts.

Cool light is most common during the “blue hour”—about an hour before sunrise and an hour after sunset—and in shade on bright days. Twilight blues add a moody, meloncholy feeling to an image (as in the photo of the blue mountains), while a snow-covered hillside or icy glacier can be rendered cool to give the psychological feeling of physical coldness.

Ultra Cool: For this shot of a blue mountain Bernabe used a Canon EOS 5D Mark III with 16–35mm f/2.8L II Canon EF lens on a Really Right Stuff tripod. Exposure was 1/13 sec at f/9, ISO 200. Photo: Richard Bernabe

As long as there are no clouds blocking the sun, the “golden hour” can flood a scene with a low-angled, warm glow both flattering to subjects and pleasing to the eyes (as in the shot of the grazing antelopes). Viewers tend to respond more favorably to warm images than cool ones.

The light near sunrise or sunset may provide the opportunity to include both warm and cool light in the same image. Look for blue tones in the shadows that contrast nicely with the warm yellows and oranges from the available sunlight. You can use color contrasts—such as the combination of blue and yellow in the Torres del Paine photo—to render an image much more dynamic and captivating than a strictly warm or cool scene.

Color Contrasts: Shooting in warm morning sunshine at the Torres del Paine National Park in Chile, Bernabe set his 70–200mm f/4L Canon EF lens to a focal length of 122mm; it was mounted on a Canon EOS 5D Mark III. His exposure was 1/160 sec at f/8, ISO 250. Photo: Richard Bernabe

Pointing the Way

There are basically three variations to consider with light direction: front light, sidelight, and backlight. Front lighting occurs when the sun is directly behind you, the photographer. If your shadow is pointing at or near your subject, you can be sure you are getting full front light. While this is relatively easy to manage—as the scene or subject is evenly illuminated and there are no shadows to worry about—the results can be boring and predictable, with little drama, and the subject often appears flat or two-dimensional.

Sidelighting—the effect of the sun illuminating the scene at about a 90-degree angle—is perfect for emphasizing texture, depth, or patterns. Sidelight can create the illusion of three-dimensional depth by creating separation between different elements in the scene. For example, a sand dune, where the ripples and texture in the sand are important elements in the image, is best captured with strong sidelighting.

Extreme Warmth: Bernabe shot these oryx antelope in warm light with a Canon EOS 5D Mark III and 100–400mm f/4.5–5.6L IS Canon EF lens, fully zoomed. Exposure was 1/200 sec at f/5.6, ISO 640. Photo: Richard Bernabe

Backlit scenes or subjects create numerous photographic difficulties—which is why beginners tend to avoid them—but they can also offer visual rewards. Backlighting can create highly dramatic effects, provided a little care is taken in the process. Subjects with translucent materials—such as grasses, fall foliage, or animal fur—can come alive with a gorgeous backlit glow or rim light.

One of the difficulties photographers encounter when using backlight is exposure. If your subject is placed in front of a strong light source, the general tendency of any camera’s metering system is to render it as underexposed. Unless you actually intend to create a silhouette, adding 1 or 2 stops of light will preserve important details in the subject.

If the sun’s rays strike the front element of the lens when attempting a backlit scene, the results may include nasty flare, ghosting, or light fogging. A lens hood can help if the sun’s rays are at the right angle, but it will be of little use when shooting directly into the sun. Try shielding the lens from any direct sunlight with your hand, a hat, or a book, as long as it doesn’t interfere with the image. Otherwise, try positioning the sun behind a tree or other obstruction, if the composition allows for it.

The challenge is to adjust your approach to the situation at hand. Once you learn how to manage variances in the intensity, color, and direction of natural light, the world is your canvas.

South Carolina–based nature and travel photographer Richard Bernabe has written many photo books and leads workshops around the world.

bear
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

bear

Harsh, Direct Sun: Bernabe captured this charging brown bear in high-intensity light at Lake Clark National Park, Alaska, with a Canon EOS 7D and 100–400mm f/4.5–5.6L IS Canon EF lens at a focal length of 260mm. Exposure was 1/640 sec at f/5.6, ISO 800. Photo: Richard Bernabe

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Video: Nikon Super-Rare 6mm Fisheye Lens

Check out the view through this massive piece of glass

We have written a lot about Nikon's 6mm Fisheye lens. You can usually find one on eBay since the super-high price tag makes it a bit of a tough sell. But, the latest auction actually has some video shot through the lens.

As you can clearly see, the 220-degree field of view is really wide. I'm not a fan of circular fisheye lenses at all, so to me, this is just a true collector's item. But, it's cool to see some footage actually shot with it. Of course, now that we're all innundated with super-wide GoPro footage, it doesn't even look that crazy.

If you want to buy this copy of the lens, the bidding currently sits around $62,000.

If you're into crazy glass, check out our list of 9 Amazing Lenses that Actually Exist

Video: Nikon Super-Rare 6mm Fisheye Lens
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Video: Nikon Super-Rare 6mm Fisheye Lens

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Famed wilderness photographer on how he gives voice to the animals

In a new TED Talk wildlife photographer Frans Lanting shares a story of a chance meeting with a tribal elder that he says has heavily influenced his photography. The elder essentially told Lanting that his people believed that all animals are the same, despite the many differences in their outward appearance.

“The ancient understanding that underneath their separate identities all animals are one has been a powerful inspiration to me,” Lanting tells the crowd. “I like to get past the fur the feathers and the scales—I want to get underneath the skin.”

A spectacular array of Lanting’s vibrant nature photographs cycle through as he shares his story. “My goal is to connect us with them eye to eye,” he says.

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Prynt Instant Printer Smartphone Case

Turn your mobile device into a portable print station for $99

By now, you probably know we're fans of instant photography. Now, a French startup called Prynt has created an interesting new smartphone case with an instant printer built right into it.

The case, despite its printing capabilities, is actually fairly slim. The case holds up to 30 or so sheets of special heat-activated paper like what you would find in Polaroid's later-model instant printers. The case connects to the phone via Bluetooth, so you can beam photos over and have them spit out in physical form.

Each photo takes roughly 30-seconds to print, which is probably about as long as it would take you to upload the photo to Instagram anyway. In a way, it works a lot like Fujifilm's Instax printer, only using zInk paper rather than traditional instant film packs.

One of the coolest features about the Prynt device (which will cost roughly $99 when it launches), is an augmented reality function. The Prynt app captures video from before and after you press the shutter. Once you make the print, you can hold it up to the phone's camera and it will play the video back to you.

It's a clever little device and, even though it won't be terribly practical, it sure sounds like something that would be very cool at a party or an event.

From: TechCrunch

Prynt Instant Printer Smartphone Case
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Prynt Instant Printer Smartphone Case

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