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2014 Fall Camera Bag Preview

Carry your gear in style this year

Photographers aren't renowned for being the most fashionable creatures. We're great at capturing beauty, but we've also been known to lug around the same, worn camera bags for years--sometimes decades--at a time. But, the number of new camera bags hitting the market this year is truly impressive, so we thought we would round up a collection of the most notable new bags you may want to ask Santa for this year.

The selection runs the gamut from small, simple shoulder bags to huge rolling cases that are capable of dragging along most of the essentials you'd find in a full-on photo studio. There has never been a time when camera gear was as diverse as it is right now and that has led to all kinds of interesting bags that dont' follow the standard sack with straps formula.

Click here to launch the gallery

2014 Fall Camera Bag Preview
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

2014 Fall Camera Bag Preview

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Lowepro Hardside Hard Camera Carrying Case

Lowepro aims for hard case protection without the foam.

Traveling can be extremely brutal on camera gear, which is why hard cases are sometimes desireable. But, they can also be impractical, which is why Lowepro has tried to make something a little more versatile with their Hardside camera cases.

There are three versions of the new Hardside cases, differentiated by size. The Hardside 200 Video is actually made specifically to carry GoPros and other action cameras, as well as the army of accessories that go with them.



The 300 and 400 Photo models are meant for carrying more traditional kit. The 300 can hold a DSLR with an attached lens as well as four-to-six other lenses or accessories. The 400 ups the ante to six-to-eight extra lenses/accessories, depending on the gear.

The outside looks extremely familiar if you've ever worked with hard cases before. It's a design that's used because it works. The shell is made from ABS Polymer and is totally waterproof when closed. It even has release valves built-into the latches for opening it and closing it in high or low altitudes, which can make pressure get crazy in cases like this.



The inside, however, looks different than many hard cases, opting out of the typical foam for a more traditional camera bag arrangement with modular padding to protect the gear. It's nice because you don't have to spend time cutting foam and you can rearrange as you wish. When you're on location, the padded section actually has backpack straps, so you can carry it around with you without the hardcase.

The Hardside 200 Video will cost $169, while the Photo 300 and 400 will cost $199 and $249, respectively.

These are almost certainly overkill for most photographers, but if you're traveling to remote and tough locations, waterproof, impact-resistant packs are certainly what you want.

Get The Case! w/ Mike Escamilla from Lowepro on Vimeo.

Lowepro Hardside Hard Camera Carrying Case
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Lowepro Hardside Hard Camera Carrying Case

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Halved Gear: Photokina 2014

See the new Photokina gear from a new perspective

For many photographers, our gear becomes like body parts. It's forever attached to us and we know how it works, odd quirks and all. But, not many of us know what's going on inside that gear. Beyond those tiny little screws that hold everything together is a complex world of intricate glass and overwhelming circuitry.

At Photokina, however, manufacturers want to give everyone a look at every aspect of their new products (and sometimes interesting old ones), so they take a saw to them and start cutting. The result is something that's a little bit painful to look at, but also incredibly interesting.

If nothing else, it may act as a reminder as to just how amazing the camera gear we're lucky enough to use really is, and how smart the people who made it really are.

CLICK HERE TO LAUNCH THE GALLERY

Halved Gear: Photokina 2014
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Halved Gear: Photokina 2014

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Moving photos by the two-time Pulitzer winner capture what life is like in refugee camps

With the Syrian Civil War in its third year and new allegations of chemical attacks perpetrated by the Assad regime in the news, two-time Pulitzer prize-winning photojournalist Muhammed Muheisen traveled to the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan to document lives of the displaced. Drawn to his striking compositions and ability to capture dignity and joy in the face of intense struggle, American Photo reached out to Muheisen to have him take over our Instagram feed (@americanphotomag) for the week of September 19 - 26.

instatakeover
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

instatakeover

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Moving photos by the two-time Pulitzer winner capture what life is like in refugee camps

With the Syrian Civil War in its third year and new allegations of chemical attacks perpetrated by the Assad regime in the news, two-time Pulitzer prize-winning photojournalist Muhammed Muheisen traveled to the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan to document lives of the displaced. Drawn to his striking compositions and ability to capture dignity and joy in the face of intense struggle, American Photo reached out to Muheisen to have him take over our Instagram feed (@americanphotomag) for the week of September 19 - 26.

instatakeover
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

instatakeover

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New Gear: Schneider-Kreuznach 35mm F/1.6 and 50mm F/1.4 DSLR Lenses

Another option for super-high-end DSLR lenses is on the horizon

If you only have experience in the digital photography world, then it seems forgivable if you're not familiar with Schneider-Kreuznach. The lens maker, however, has been making extremely high-quality lenses since well before megapixels were even a thing. Now, they're releasing a line of super high-end DSLR lenses that will be looking to compete with others like the massive and beautiful Zeiss Otus glass.

There are three lenses set to debut down the road. The Xenon 1.6/35 is a 35mm lens with a maximum aperture of F/1.6. The second is a 1.4/50mm, and both lenses will have an electrical interface with the camera so you can check your focus using the indicator in the camera. The Nikon version will also have a mechanical, automatic iris. The third lens is an 85mm F/2.4 Macro Symmar lens.

All three lenses will be available in Canon and Nikon mounts, but there's no word on release date or pricing yet. They won't be cheap, but they all also likely be extremely good.

They're also going to be massive. According to a PDF guide released by the company, the two shorter lenses will have a front diameter of 85.5mm and the macro will have a 92.8mm front element.

If super high-end manual focus DSLR lenses are becoming a trend, then that's one trend we can really get behind.

New Gear: Schneider-Kreuznach 35mm F/1.6 and 50mm F/1.4 DSLR Lenses
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

New Gear: Schneider-Kreuznach 35mm F/1.6 and 50mm F/1.4 DSLR Lenses

read more


New Gear: Schneider-Kreuznach 35mm F/1.6 and 50mm F/1.4 DSLR Lenses

Another option for super-high-end DSLR lenses is on the horizon

If you only have experience in the digital photography world, then it seems forgivable if you're not familiar with Schneider-Kreuznach. The lens maker, however, has been making extremely high-quality lenses since well before megapixels were even a thing. Now, they're releasing a line of super high-end DSLR lenses that will be looking to compete with others like the massive and beautiful Zeiss Otus glass.

There are three lenses set to debut down the road. The Xenon 1.6/35 is a 35mm lens with a maximum aperture of F/1.6. The second is a 1.4/50mm, and both lenses will have an electrical interface with the camera so you can check your focus using the indicator in the camera. The Nikon version will also have a mechanical, automatic iris. The third lens is an 85mm F/2.4 Macro Symmar lens.

All three lenses will be available in Canon and Nikon mounts, but there's no word on release date or pricing yet. They won't be cheap, but they all also likely be extremely good.

They're also going to be massive. According to a PDF guide released by the company, the two shorter lenses will have a front diameter of 85.5mm and the macro will have a 92.8mm front element.

If super high-end manual focus DSLR lenses are becoming a trend, then that's one trend we can really get behind.

New Gear: Schneider-Kreuznach 35mm F/1.6 and 50mm F/1.4 DSLR Lenses
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

New Gear: Schneider-Kreuznach 35mm F/1.6 and 50mm F/1.4 DSLR Lenses

read more








The Sony A7S shows off its serious light sensitivity in this moonlit video from the California coast

We were pretty excited to see how the Sony A7S would perform when it was announced last spring during the NAB trade show. The A7S had tons more processing power, could handle 4K video capture and had an ISO range of 50-409,600—putting it on-par with the Nikon D4s.

This video, released last week by Carbon Studios, puts the sensitivity of the A7S to the test and shows that the camera performs great in incredibly low light situations. The moonlit video was captured on Sept. 8 from 12:30 a.m.- 2 a.m. The first scene was shot at 1/25, f/1.4 with a 25,600 ISO; the second shot at 1/25, f/1.4 with a 32,000 ISO and the rest of the footage at 1/30, f/1.4 with a 12,800 ISO.

We can't wait to put the Sony A7S through a full Pop Photo test.

moonlit
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

moonlit

A still from Carbon Studios' "Moonlight".

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The Sony A7S shows off its serious light sensitivity in this moonlit video from the California coast

We were pretty excited to see how the Sony A7S would perform when it was announced last spring during the NAB trade show. The A7S had tons more processing power, could handle 4K video capture and had an ISO range of 50-409,600—putting it on-par with the Nikon D4s.

This video, released last week by Carbon Studios, puts the sensitivity of the A7S to the test and shows that the camera performs great in incredibly low light situations. The moonlit video was captured on Sept. 8 from 12:30 a.m.- 2 a.m. The first scene was shot at 1/25, f/1.4 with a 25,600 ISO; the second shot at 1/25, f/1.4 with a 32,000 ISO and the rest of the footage at 1/30, f/1.4 with a 12,800 ISO.

We can't wait to put the Sony A7S through a full Pop Photo test.

moonlit
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

moonlit

A still from Carbon Studios' "Moonlight".

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Can you find decisive moments at the Egyptian Pyramids from the comfort of your computer?

In recent years, a number of artist have taken to street photography practiced from the comfort of their own computers. Doug Richard, Jon Rafman, Michael Wolf and many other have made ‘photographs’ by screen-grabbing scenes from Google’s 3D mapping software, Street View. Though met with a huge amount of initial criticism and accused of being somehow uncreative, lazy and un-photographic, they indisputably captured many decisive moments, surprising and bizarre scenes and unique compositions.

This month, Google unveiled it’s latest Street View ‘Trek’ through the Pyramids of Giza. Following up on the success of their awe-inspiring Street View of the Grand Canyon, Venice and the Galapagos Islands, Google sent out its ’Trekkers’ with 75-megapixel panoramic cameras mounted on their backpacks to capture 360-degree views of the Egyptian desert landscape. The virtual tour includes the Giza Necropolis and the Great Sphinx.

Those with some time to kill may be inclined to try screenshot photography and see if they can come up with any unique perspectives.

Google Giza
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Google Giza

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Can you find decisive moments at the Egyptian Pyramids from the comfort of your computer?

In recent years, a number of artist have taken to street photography practiced from the comfort of their own computers. Doug Richard, Jon Rafman, Michael Wolf and many other have made ‘photographs’ by screen-grabbing scenes from Google’s 3D mapping software, Street View. Though met with a huge amount of initial criticism and accused of being somehow uncreative, lazy and un-photographic, they indisputably captured many decisive moments, surprising and bizarre scenes and unique compositions.

This month, Google unveiled it’s latest Street View ‘Trek’ through the Pyramids of Giza. Following up on the success of their awe-inspiring Street View of the Grand Canyon, Venice and the Galapagos Islands, Google sent out its ’Trekkers’ with 75-megapixel panoramic cameras mounted on their backpacks to capture 360-degree views of the Egyptian desert landscape. The virtual tour includes the Giza Necropolis and the Great Sphinx.

Those with some time to kill may be inclined to try screenshot photography and see if they can come up with any unique perspectives.

Google Giza
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Google Giza

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Tamron 15-30mm F/2.8 Full-Frame Zoom Lens Photokina 2014

Spend some early quality time with Tamron's promising new wide-angle zoom.

The new super-wide zoom from Tamron is under glass on the Photokina 2014 show floor, but they were kind enough to give us a few minutes to experience it in person.

In terms of size, the lens seems a bit less bulky than the popular Nikon 14-24mm F/2.8, and roughly the same size as the Canon 16-35mm F/2.8L, maybe a little bigger. The difference here, of course, is that the Tamron 15-30mm has built-in Vibration Compensation and an F/2.8 constant aperture, which sets it apart.



One of the things you immediately notice is that the front element bulges out a bit, as is sometimes the case with wide angle lenses. Tamron has done a few things to help protect it when you're out shooting. As you can see in the video, the new fluorine coating does a pretty excellent job of resisting smudges and finger prints. They did a demo for us where they tried to write on the front element with a permanent marker and it wiped right off. This isn't the first lens to use a fluorine coating, but it certainly makes a lot of sense in this context.

The integrated hood also has a clever design intended to protect the glass. When you zoom, the front element comes forward, and with it comes another layer of plastic inside the hood to make it more robust.

Of course, we'll have to wait to make a judgement on the lens once we have all the details and can see how it performs from an imaging standpoint, but so far, this lens seems to stand up to the hype it has received here at the show. There's still no pricing or availability information at this time, but we'll update you as soon as we know.

Tamron 15-30mm F/2.8 Full-Frame Zoom Lens Photokina 2014
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Tamron 15-30mm F/2.8 Full-Frame Zoom Lens Photokina 2014

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Tamron 15-30mm F/2.8 Full-Frame Zoom Lens Photokina 2014

Spend some early quality time with Tamron's promising new wide-angle zoom.

The new super-wide zoom from Tamron is under glass on the Photokina 2014 show floor, but they were kind enough to give us a few minutes to experience it in person.

In terms of size, the lens seems a bit less bulky than the popular Nikon 14-24mm F/2.8, and roughly the same size as the Canon 16-35mm F/2.8L, maybe a little bigger. The difference here, of course, is that the Tamron 15-30mm has built-in Vibration Compensation and an F/2.8 constant aperture, which sets it apart.

http://cf.c.ooyala.com/42czRmcDp4aGZVqfuSb3VwkVhfXYzEEM/3Gduepif0T1UGY8H4xMDoxOjA4MTsiGN

Please enable Javascript to watch this video



One of the things you immediately notice is that the front element bulges out a bit, as is sometimes the case with wide angle lenses. Tamron has done a few things to help protect it when you're out shooting. As you can see in the video, the new fluorine coating does a pretty excellent job of resisting smudges and finger prints. They did a demo for us where they tried to write on the front element with a permanent marker and it wiped right off. This isn't the first lens to use a fluorine coating, but it certainly makes a lot of sense in this context.

The integrated hood also has a clever design intended to protect the glass. When you zoom, the front element comes forward, and with it comes another layer of plastic inside the hood to make it more robust.

Of course, we'll have to wait to make a judgement on the lens once we have all the details and can see how it performs from an imaging standpoint, but so far, this lens seems to stand up to the hype it has received here at the show. There's still no pricing or availability information at this time, but we'll update you as soon as we know.

Tamron 15-30mm F/2.8 Full-Frame Zoom Lens Photokina 2014
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Tamron 15-30mm F/2.8 Full-Frame Zoom Lens Photokina 2014

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Ricoh WG-M1 Rugged Waterproof Camera Hands-On

Our first chance to check out Ricoh's new tough camera

There are a lot of action cameras here on the floor of Photokina 2014 and the vast majority of them seem to be shameless GoPro knockoffs. Ricoh's WG-M1 action camera, however, seems to be a bit different.



The thing I was most curious about before holding the camera was its size and weight. Overall, it's roughly the same size as a GoPro 3 in its waterproof housing, but a little bigger. The lens also sticks out past the body. From the original pictures, the fact that it has a built-in screen can make it seem bigger than it actually is. It was also actually a little lighter than I expected it to be in my hand. Weight is a crucial thing to consider when you're going to be mounting your camera to your body or your bike (or kayak, or motorcycle, or race car, or whatever), so I was glad it didn't feel like a brick.

The control pattern is extremely simple. There's a power button and a record button on one side and the other side has the buttons that allow you to navigate the menus.



The screen feels small, but that's likely due to how spoiled I've gotten by big 3.2-inch DSLR screens. Really, the fact that the WG-M1 has a screen at all is a small victory because it means you don't need a wireless connection or an add-on accessory to set-up your shot or review your footage.


I'm looking forward to giving the camera a full review down the road, but right now, this looks like a promising action cam option. It's not likely to knock the GoPro from its massive marketshare throne, but it could prove another viable option for people with specific needs, much like the Sony Action Camera currently does.

Ricoh WG-M1 Rugged Waterproof Camera Hands-On
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Ricoh WG-M1 Rugged Waterproof Camera Hands-On

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Ricoh WG-M1 Rugged Waterproof Camera Hands-On

Our first chance to check out Ricoh's new tough camera

There are a lot of action cameras here on the floor of Photokina 2014 and the vast majority of them seem to be shameless GoPro knockoffs. Ricoh's WG-M1 action camera, however, seems to be a bit different.

http://cf.c.ooyala.com/JtcHhkcDodQHIqZ_Vd_PkBLr5DrrgxZI/3Gduepif0T1UGY8H4xMDoxOjA4MTsiGN

Please enable Javascript to watch this video



The thing I was most curious about before holding the camera was its size and weight. Overall, it's roughly the same size as a GoPro 3 in its waterproof housing, but a little bigger. The lens also sticks out past the body. From the original pictures, the fact that it has a built-in screen can make it seem bigger than it actually is. It was also actually a little lighter than I expected it to be in my hand. Weight is a crucial thing to consider when you're going to be mounting your camera to your body or your bike (or kayak, or motorcycle, or race car, or whatever), so I was glad it didn't feel like a brick.

The control pattern is extremely simple. There's a power button and a record button on one side and the other side has the buttons that allow you to navigate the menus.



The screen feels small, but that's likely due to how spoiled I've gotten by big 3.2-inch DSLR screens. Really, the fact that the WG-M1 has a screen at all is a small victory because it means you don't need a wireless connection or an add-on accessory to set-up your shot or review your footage.


I'm looking forward to giving the camera a full review down the road, but right now, this looks like a promising action cam option. It's not likely to knock the GoPro from its massive marketshare throne, but it could prove another viable option for people with specific needs, much like the Sony Action Camera currently does.

Ricoh WG-M1 Rugged Waterproof Camera Hands-On
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Ricoh WG-M1 Rugged Waterproof Camera Hands-On

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Capture One Pro Photo Editing Software

Phase One takes aim at Adobe, Aperture users with their latest upgrades

There are a lot of photo editing apps out there, but in my opinion, Capture One Pro is up there with the very best of them. Now, the software is hitting its eighth edition and it's bringing some new features, as well as a new subscription plan.

The new features included in Capture One Pro 8 seem to be aimed at converting some of the huge number of users already embedded into the Adobe eco-system. You can now use clone and heal layers to take unwanted objects out of an image, and they have created migration tools to help users come over seamlessly from Lightroom or the soon-to-be-gone Aperture software.

Capture One Pro 8 also seems to keep all the things that made it excellent in the first place. The tethered shooting options are robust and the raw image processing is among the best in terms of image quality.

They have also added a new film grain emulation system to help those who want to give their images a more analog aesthetic.

The software will cost $299 if you're just buying into the platform, but upgrades from the old version are $99. If that's too steep for you, they also offer a $10/month subscription plan, much like Adobe's Creative Cloud for Photographers.

We're looking forward to trying out the new features and will bring you a full review in the coming weeks.

More info: Here

Capture One Pro Photo Editing Software
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Capture One Pro 8 Photo Editing Software

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Capture One Pro Photo Editing Software

Phase One takes aim at Adobe, Aperture users with their latest upgrades

There are a lot of photo editing apps out there, but in my opinion, Capture One Pro is up there with the very best of them. Now, the software is hitting its eighth edition and it's bringing some new features, as well as a new subscription plan.

The new features included in Capture One Pro 8 seem to be aimed at converting some of the huge number of users already embedded into the Adobe eco-system. You can now use clone and heal layers to take unwanted objects out of an image, and they have created migration tools to help users come over seamlessly from Lightroom or the soon-to-be-gone Aperture software.

Capture One Pro 8 also seems to keep all the things that made it excellent in the first place. The tethered shooting options are robust and the raw image processing is among the best in terms of image quality.

They have also added a new film grain emulation system to help those who want to give their images a more analog aesthetic.

The software will cost $299 if you're just buying into the platform, but upgrades from the old version are $99. If that's too steep for you, they also offer a $10/month subscription plan, much like Adobe's Creative Cloud for Photographers.

We're looking forward to trying out the new features and will bring you a full review in the coming weeks.

More info: Here

Capture One Pro Photo Editing Software
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Capture One Pro 8 Photo Editing Software

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"I love these little gum spots on the ground! It's like a city of polka dots!"

Human of New York's Brandon Stanton has been on his UN World Tour since mid-August (he's currently snapping strangers' portraits in India), but there are apparently still plenty of New Yorkers who are eager to have their face featured on his blog.

Yesterday, comedian Tyler Fischer posted a video of himself, dressed in a backward baseball cap with a DSLR in hand, duping enthusiastic strangers into believing he is Stanton and taking a number of terrible out-of-focus and up-nose shots along the way. At one point, a woman whose "portrait" Fischer is taking almost calls him out on his stunt. "I thought he was traveling, though?" she says. To which Fischer responds: "We sent interns. They said it was too dangerous."

Watch the full video below.

[Via Death and Taxes]

fake HONY
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

fake HONY

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"I love these little gum spots on the ground! It's like a city of polka dots!"

Human of New York's Brandon Stanton has been on his UN World Tour since mid-August (he's currently snapping strangers' portraits in India), but there are apparently still plenty of New Yorkers who are eager to have their face featured on his blog.

Yesterday, comedian Tyler Fischer posted a video of himself, dressed in a backward baseball cap with a DSLR in hand, duping enthusiastic strangers into believing he is Stanton and taking a number of terrible out-of-focus and up-nose shots along the way. At one point, a woman whose "portrait" Fischer is taking almost calls him out on his stunt. "I thought he was traveling, though?" she says. To which Fischer responds: "We sent interns. They said it was too dangerous."

Watch the full video below.

[Via Death and Taxes]

fake HONY
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

fake HONY

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Cooph Clothing for Photographers

Clothing for photographers that's high on both style and functionality

When it comes to fashionable photography gear, things have gotten a lot better in recent decades. When was the last time you saw a photo vest? But COOPH clothing makes extremely stylish clothing that's made with photographers in mind.

The thing that drew me into the booth was the Bad Weather Shooting Cape. The name is funny, but once the rep explained to me what it was, I was actually impressed. The jacket itself is made of a totally waterproof material and has big zippers leading straight to the inside of the jacket so you an stick a camera out of the opening and shoot while keeping your gear protected. It also has a few massive pockets built-in so you can carry your gear out of the elements.



The hoodies are equally as useful. They have similarly huge pockets and lots of access to the inside via zippers. It even has snaps at the bottom and the top so you can fold the hoodie into a pillow when you travel or wrap your gear before putting it in a bag.



The Photographer's Long Sleeve Shirt has a built-in lens cap pocket, as well as a lens cloth sewn into the bottom of the shirt. On the lens cloth is a photo from which the color pallet of the shirt was selected. Snaps on the arms make it very easy to roll them up.



The gloves are made from super-soft goat leather and have finger tip pads that cooperate with capacitive touch screens like the ones you'll find in cameras and smartphones.



Even the hats have some photographic utility. Some have simple lens cap pockets on the site, but others have a hidden bungee cord built in so you can turn them into lens pouches when you're not wearing them.



And yes, the T-shirts have lens cap pockets as well.

Unfortunately, COOPH gear isn't available in the USA, but they said they're hoping to be selling there by the middle of 2015.

Cooph Clothing for Photographers
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Cooph Clothing for Photographers

read more


Cooph Clothing for Photographers

Clothing for photographers that's high on both style and functionality

When it comes to fashionable photography gear, things have gotten a lot better in recent decades. When was the last time you saw a photo vest? But COOPH clothing makes extremely stylish clothing that's made with photographers in mind.

The thing that drew me into the booth was the Bad Weather Shooting Cape. The name is funny, but once the rep explained to me what it was, I was actually impressed. The jacket itself is made of a totally waterproof material and has big zippers leading straight to the inside of the jacket so you an stick a camera out of the opening and shoot while keeping your gear protected. It also has a few massive pockets built-in so you can carry your gear out of the elements.



The hoodies are equally as useful. They have similarly huge pockets and lots of access to the inside via zippers. It even has snaps at the bottom and the top so you can fold the hoodie into a pillow when you travel or wrap your gear before putting it in a bag.



The Photographer's Long Sleeve Shirt has a built-in lens cap pocket, as well as a lens cloth sewn into the bottom of the shirt. On the lens cloth is a photo from which the color pallet of the shirt was selected. Snaps on the arms make it very easy to roll them up.



The gloves are made from super-soft goat leather and have finger tip pads that cooperate with capacitive touch screens like the ones you'll find in cameras and smartphones.



Even the hats have some photographic utility. Some have simple lens cap pockets on the site, but others have a hidden bungee cord built in so you can turn them into lens pouches when you're not wearing them.



And yes, the T-shirts have lens cap pockets as well.

Unfortunately, COOPH gear isn't available in the USA, but they said they're hoping to be selling there by the middle of 2015.

Cooph Clothing for Photographers
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Cooph Clothing for Photographers

read more








Leica M Edition 60 Camera

Leica's new digital camera makes you practice your patience

Every two years, Photokina is Leica's chance to really blow things out on their home turf. Last time, they had a massive gala to unleash their new M-series cameras. This year, they're celebrating the 60th anniversary of their iconic M-series with a couple very interesting cameras.

The big story is the new M Edition 60, which is a digital camera, but you'd never know by looking at it because, well, there's no screen. And no, it's not an electronic viewfinder or some other trick. You really can't see your photos until you upload them onto a computer. Their intention is to make it simple and take it back to its original roots in film.

Instead of a screen, there's a simple, familiar dial that lets you select the camera's ISO setting. In most other ways, it's extremely similar to the regular M camera.

It's something that we'd really only expect from Leica and they certainly delivered. It's sure to start many arguments in comment sections around the web.



The M-A also doesn't have a display on the back, but that's because it's a film camera. It's fully mechanical and is based around the design of the M-P. Again, it's a celebration of the camera's roots, so it has been stripped to its absolute basics, even eschewing things like a built-in meter.

Neither camera has pricing information available at this time, but neither will be cheap. Never stop being you, Leica.

Leica M Edition 60 Camera
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Leica M Edition 60 Camera

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Leica M Edition 60 Camera

Leica's new digital camera makes you practice your patience

Every two years, Photokina is Leica's chance to really blow things out on their home turf. Last time, they had a massive gala to unleash their new M-series cameras. This year, they're celebrating the 60th anniversary of their iconic M-series with a couple very interesting cameras.

The big story is the new M Edition 60, which is a digital camera, but you'd never know by looking at it because, well, there's no screen. And no, it's not an electronic viewfinder or some other trick. You really can't see your photos until you upload them onto a computer. Their intention is to make it simple and take it back to its original roots in film.

Instead of a screen, there's a simple, familiar dial that lets you select the camera's ISO setting. In most other ways, it's extremely similar to the regular M camera.

It's something that we'd really only expect from Leica and they certainly delivered. It's sure to start many arguments in comment sections around the web.



The M-A also doesn't have a display on the back, but that's because it's a film camera. It's fully mechanical and is based around the design of the M-P. Again, it's a celebration of the camera's roots, so it has been stripped to its absolute basics, even eschewing things like a built-in meter.

Neither camera has pricing information available at this time, but neither will be cheap. Never stop being you, Leica.

Leica M Edition 60 Camera
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Leica M Edition 60 Camera

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Canon 7D Mark II DSLR Hands-On

We spend some quality time with Canon's new APS-C camera

One of the biggest news stories so far at Photokina 2014 is the release of the much-anticipated Canon 7D Mark II. I've been using the original 7D as part of my own personal kit since 2009, so I was very interested in trying the follow-up. The model I used was not final, so I can't make any decisions about image quality just yet, but I was pretty impressed with the shooting experience so far.

Feel
Picking up the camera, it feels a lot like the original 7D. The magnesium alloy body makes it feel a bit heavier than the 6D I brought with me, but it also feels really sturdy. According to a Canon rep, however, that magnesium alloy body is also one of the reasons there's no WiFi in the camera. The signal has a hard time getting through the metal shell. There is a plastic cap in the top, but that spot is occupied by the GPS, which they say people prefer. Personally, I think I'd rather have the WiFi, but GPS does make sense in an "adventure" oriented camera like this.



The layout hasn't changed all that much from the original. It has been updated to feel more like the current line of Canon DSLRs. There's still no touch screen, which seems like it was likely done in the interest of durability.

Autofocus
This is where things get pretty interesting. The original 7D had one of the faster AF systems when it was released and the 7D Mark II's system seems to blow it out of the water. They have included a lot of the features also found in higher-end cameras like the 5D Mark III and the monstrous 1D X.

In the menu system, you can select different use cases for the AF system that perform differently under fast-moving situations. If you want to set it so it won't get distracted by objects flying into the scene, you can do that. If you want to pan more effectively without the AF buzzing around, you can do that, too. It takes a bit of getting used to, but once you know what the modes do, they can be extremely handy.



The AF point coverage on the sensor gets much closer to the edge than it does on the 5D Mark III due to the crop sensor. The AF points cover the vast majority of a scene, which gives you a ton of great composition options. It's not quite as insane as something like the new Samsung NX1, which has more than 200 phase-detection AF points that basically extend to the edge of the screen, but it's still very good.

They have added a new switch to the back of the camera that lets you quickly switch between each of the focus modes. You can use single-point, or select the whole area and let the camera do all the focusing work for you. You can choose small groups as well as large groups of pixels. Honestly, I wasn't that excited about this feature when I heard about it--after all, it's just a switch—but it immediately became one of my favorite features about the camera. It can be overwhelming to have all these focus options on a camera, but having them available at the flick of a switch made them far more accessible.



The AF tracking (even though these were beta units) seemed excellent. We were shooting people jumping on a very fancy trampoline and the focus was grabbing onto them and not letting go. The camera can churn out bursts at up to 10 fps and, even though the gymnasts weren't even close to standing still, they still stayed extremely sharp, even when I just put the camera in auto AF area and let it decide for me.

I was using the Canon 18-135mm STM kit lens, which is designed to work very well with the dual-pixel AF in the camera, so I switched over to live view a bit as well, which is something I'd never typically do in this situation.

I liked using the hybrid AF with the 70D, but I was primarily using the touchscreen to show it where to go. Without the touchscreen, it's an entirely different experience. It still locks focus surprisingly well, but I'm a bit spoiled being able to just poke where I want to focus.

Overall, the camera actually does feel a lot like using a mini version of the 1D X. It's a thing I kept hearing in the press room and, for the most part, it seems true. The 10 fps burst rate and the zippy AF would make me feel very confident in a sports shooting situation.



Now, the question is how it performs on the imaging front. The original 7D, in my opinion, was never the best when it came to noise. It wasn't a problem, really, but there were other APS-C DSLRs out there that produced less noisy images. Now, they have added a few megapixels to the equation, but they have also coupled that with a pair of their most powerful image processors, so I'm very curious to see what the final photos look like.

I also got a chance to check out the new Canon 400mm F/4 DO IS USM lens, but I didn't actually get to shoot with it. For those who are unfamiliar, the DO stands for diffractive optics, which is a different way to layout the glass inside the lens. By splitting the light apart into its colored elements and then converging them again before hitting the sensor, it's supposed to eliminate chromatic aberration, which happens as a result of different wavelengths of light bending a slightly different angles.



While I can say literally nothing about its performance, I can say it's really something to pick up a lens that long and that massive and only have it weigh roughly 4.5-pounds. Having used the F/2.8 version for a while, I got used to the massive weight of it. This felt like a vacation in comparison. We hope to give it a full test down the road.

We'll be on the show floor throughout the week checking out all the new and awesome stuff Photokina 2014 has to offer, so be sure to stay tuned.

Canon 7D Mark II DSLR Hands-On
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Canon 7D mark II DSLR Hands-On

read more


Canon 7D Mark II DSLR Hands-On

We spend some quality time with Canon's new APS-C camera

One of the biggest news stories so far at Photokina 2014 is the release of the much-anticipated Canon 7D Mark II. I've been using the original 7D as part of my own personal kit since 2009, so I was very interested in trying the follow-up. The model I used was not final, so I can't make any decisions about image quality just yet, but I was pretty impressed with the shooting experience so far.

Feel
Picking up the camera, it feels a lot like the original 7D. The magnesium alloy body makes it feel a bit heavier than the 6D I brought with me, but it also feels really sturdy. According to a Canon rep, however, that magnesium alloy body is also one of the reasons there's no WiFi in the camera. The signal has a hard time getting through the metal shell. There is a plastic cap in the top, but that spot is occupied by the GPS, which they say people prefer. Personally, I think I'd rather have the WiFi, but GPS does make sense in an "adventure" oriented camera like this.



The layout hasn't changed all that much from the original. It has been updated to feel more like the current line of Canon DSLRs. There's still no touch screen, which seems like it was likely done in the interest of durability.

Autofocus
This is where things get pretty interesting. The original 7D had one of the faster AF systems when it was released and the 7D Mark II's system seems to blow it out of the water. They have included a lot of the features also found in higher-end cameras like the 5D Mark III and the monstrous 1D X.

In the menu system, you can select different use cases for the AF system that perform differently under fast-moving situations. If you want to set it so it won't get distracted by objects flying into the scene, you can do that. If you want to pan more effectively without the AF buzzing around, you can do that, too. It takes a bit of getting used to, but once you know what the modes do, they can be extremely handy.



The AF point coverage on the sensor gets much closer to the edge than it does on the 5D Mark III due to the crop sensor. The AF points cover the vast majority of a scene, which gives you a ton of great composition options. It's not quite as insane as something like the new Samsung NX1, which has more than 200 phase-detection AF points that basically extend to the edge of the screen, but it's still very good.

They have added a new switch to the back of the camera that lets you quickly switch between each of the focus modes. You can use single-point, or select the whole area and let the camera do all the focusing work for you. You can choose small groups as well as large groups of pixels. Honestly, I wasn't that excited about this feature when I heard about it--after all, it's just a switch—but it immediately became one of my favorite features about the camera. It can be overwhelming to have all these focus options on a camera, but having them available at the flick of a switch made them far more accessible.



The AF tracking (even though these were beta units) seemed excellent. We were shooting people jumping on a very fancy trampoline and the focus was grabbing onto them and not letting go. The camera can churn out bursts at up to 10 fps and, even though the gymnasts weren't even close to standing still, they still stayed extremely sharp, even when I just put the camera in auto AF area and let it decide for me.

I was using the Canon 18-135mm STM kit lens, which is designed to work very well with the dual-pixel AF in the camera, so I switched over to live view a bit as well, which is something I'd never typically do in this situation.

I liked using the hybrid AF with the 70D, but I was primarily using the touchscreen to show it where to go. Without the touchscreen, it's an entirely different experience. It still locks focus surprisingly well, but I'm a bit spoiled being able to just poke where I want to focus.

Overall, the camera actually does feel a lot like using a mini version of the 1D X. It's a thing I kept hearing in the press room and, for the most part, it seems true. The 10 fps burst rate and the zippy AF would make me feel very confident in a sports shooting situation.



Now, the question is how it performs on the imaging front. The original 7D, in my opinion, was never the best when it came to noise. It wasn't a problem, really, but there were other APS-C DSLRs out there that produced less noisy images. Now, they have added a few megapixels to the equation, but they have also coupled that with a pair of their most powerful image processors, so I'm very curious to see what the final photos look like.

I also got a chance to check out the new Canon 400mm F/4 DO IS USM lens, but I didn't actually get to shoot with it. For those who are unfamiliar, the DO stands for diffractive optics, which is a different way to layout the glass inside the lens. By splitting the light apart into its colored elements and then converging them again before hitting the sensor, it's supposed to eliminate chromatic aberration, which happens as a result of different wavelengths of light bending a slightly different angles.



While I can say literally nothing about its performance, I can say it's really something to pick up a lens that long and that massive and only have it weigh roughly 4.5-pounds. Having used the F/2.8 version for a while, I got used to the massive weight of it. This felt like a vacation in comparison. We hope to give it a full test down the road.

We'll be on the show floor throughout the week checking out all the new and awesome stuff Photokina 2014 has to offer, so be sure to stay tuned.

Canon 7D Mark II DSLR Hands-On
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Canon 7D mark II DSLR Hands-On

read more